Informed, engaged communities for health

Search
Generic filters
Filter by Categories
@WePublicHealth2021
#CroakeyLIVE #Budget2021Health
#MHReform
#OutOfTheBox
#QldVotesHealth
#RCIADIC30Years
#RuralHealthJustice
#TRIPSwaiver
2021 Floods
Budget2020Health
Bushfires
codesign
community control
COVID-19
Croakey Conference News Service
#2020ResearchExcellence
#21OPCC
#BackToTheFire
#ChoosingWisely2022
#FoodGovernance2021
#GiantSteps21
#Govern4Health
#GreenHealthForum21
#HealthClimateSolutions21
#HealthReImagined
#HearMe21
#IndigenousClimateJustice21
#NNF2021
#RANZCP2021
#RANZCP2022
#RTP22
#SAHeapsUnfair
#ShiftingGearsSummit
#ValueBasedCare
#WCepi2021
#YHFSummit
Equally Well 2022 Symposium
GiantSteps22
Croakey Professional Services
#CommunityControl
#COVIDthinktank21
#KidneyCareTogether
ACSQHC series
ACSQHC series 2019
ACSQHC series 2020
ACSQHC series 2021
ACSQHC series 2022
CATSINaM 25 Years
Lowitja Indigenous knowledge translation series
Croakey projects
@WePublicHealth
@WePublicHealth2020
@WePublicHealth2022
#CommunityMatters
#CoveringClimateNow
#CroakeyLIVE #USvotesHealth
#CroakeyREAD
#CroakeyVOICES
#CroakeyYOUTH
#HealthyCOP26
#HousingJusticeAus
#JusticeCOVID
#LookingLocal
#MRFFtransparency
#OutOfPocket
#TalkingTeeth
AroundTheTraps
Caring for the Frontline
COVID SNAPS
COVIDglobalMHseries
Croakey longreads
CroakeyEXPLORE
Gavin Mooney
Inside Story
Journal Watch
PIJ Commissions 2020
PIJ Commissions 2022
Summer Reading 2019-2020
The Conversation
The Health Wrap
TOO MUCH of a Good Thing
CroakeyGO
#CroakeyGO #NavigatingHealth
#GamblingHarms
#HeatwaveHealth
Mapping CroakeyGo
CroakeyNews
Cultural determinants of health
Digital platforms
Elections and budgets
Federal Budget 2019-20
Federal Budget 2020-21
Federal Budget 2022-23
Federal Election 2022
SA election 2022
Federal Budget 2021-22
Global health and climate change
2019-20 climate bushfire emergency
asylum seeker and refugee health
Climate emergency
disasters
Ebola
extreme weather events
flooding 2011
Flooding 2022
Global health
NHS
NSW 2022
NZ Election 2017
WHO
health
Health workers
Healthcare and health reform
abortion
adverse events
Aged care
Allied healthcare
Australian Medical Association
cancer
cardiovascular disease
child health
Choosing Wisely
chronic diseases
co-payments
Cochrane Collaboration
complementary medicines
conflicts of interest
death and dying
diabetes
digital technology
disabilities
e-health
emergency departments and care
Equally Well
euthanasia
evidence-based issues
general practice
genetics
health & medical marketing
health and medical education
health and medical research
Health Care Homes
health ethics
health financing and costs
Health reform
health regulation
health workforce
HIV/AIDS
hospitals
HRT
infectious diseases
influenza
international medical graduates
journal articles
LGBTIQ
medical marijuana
Medicare Locals
men's health
Mental health
MyHospitals website
National Commission of Audit 2014
National Health Performance Authority
naturopathy
NDIS
NHMRC
non communicable diseases
Nursing and midwifery
oral health
organ transplants
out of pocket costs
pain
palliative care
paramedics
pathology
Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme
pharmaceutical industry
pharmacy
Pregnancy and childbirth
Primary Health Networks
Primary healthcare
private health insurance
Rural and remote health
Safety and quality of healthcare
screening
sexual health
Social media and healthcare
suicide
surgery
swine flu
telehealth
tests
TGA
trauma
women's health
youth health
Indigenous health
#CTG10
#NTRC
Acknowledgement
cultural safety
Indigenous education
Lowitja Institute
NT Intervention
social and emotional wellbeing
Uluru Statement
WA community closures
News about Croakey
PIJ Commissions 2021
Public health and population health
#PreventiveHealthStrategy
#UnmetNeedsinPublicHealth
air pollution
alcohol
consumer health matters
COVIDwrap
environmental health
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD)
food and nutrition
gambling
Government 2.0
gun control
health communications
health impact assessment
Health in All Policies
Health inequalities
health literacy
human rights
illicit drugs
injuries
legal issues
marriage equality
Media Doctor Australia
media-related issues
nanny state
National Preventive Health Agency
obesity
occupational health
physical activity
plain packaging
prevention
Public health
Public interest journalism
road safety
sport
sugar tax
tobacco control
transport
vaccination
violence
Web 2.0
weight loss products
Royal Commission
Social determinants of health
commercial determinants of health
discrimination
education
Housing
justice
Justice Reinvestment
NBN
Newstart
poverty
Racism
social policy
Summer reading 2020-2021
Summer reading 2021-2022
Tasmanian election 2021
The Croakey Archives
#cripcroakey
#HealthEquity16
#HealthMatters
#IHMayDay (all years)
#IHMayDay 2014
#IHMayDay15
#IHMayday16
#IHMayDay17
#IHMayDay18
#LoveRural 2014
Croakey Conference News Service 2013 – 2019
2013 conferences
Australian Centre for Health Services Innovation Forum 2013
Australian Health Promotion Association Conference 2013
Closing the Credibility Gap 2013
CRANAplus Conference 2013
FASD Conference 2013
Health Workforce Australia 2013
International Health Literacy Network Conference 2013
NACCHO Summit 2013
National Rural Health Conference 2013
Oceania EcoHealth Symposium 2013
PHAA conference 2013
2014 conferences
#IPCHIV14
AIDA Conference 2014
Congress Lowitja 2014
CRANAplus conference 2014
Cultural Solutions - Healing Foundation forum 2014
Lowitja Institute Continuous Quality Improvement conference 2014
National Suicide Prevention Conference 2014
Racism and children/youth health symposium 2014
Rural & Remote Health Scientific Symposium 2014
2015 conferences
#CPHCEforum
#CRANAplus15
#HSR15
#NRHC15
#OTCC15
Population Health Congress 2015
2016 conferences
#AHHAsim16
#AHMRC16
#ANROWS2016
#ATSISPEP
#AusCanIndigenousWellness
#cphce2016
#CPHCEforum16
#CRANAplus2016
#IAMRA2016
#LowitjaConf2016
#PreventObesity16
#TowardsRecovery
#VMIAC16
#WearablesCEH
#WICC2016
2017 conferences
#17APCC
#ACEM17
#AIDAconf2017
#BTH20
#CATSINaM17
#ClimateHealthStrategy
#IAHAConf17
#IDS17
#LBQWHC17
#LivingOurWay
#OKtoAskAu
#OTCC2017
#ResearchTranslation17
#TheMHS2017
#VMIACConf17
#WCPH2017
Australian Palliative Care Conference
2018 conferences
#6rrhss
#ACEM18
#AHPA2018
#ATSISPC18
#CPHCE
#MHED18
#NDISMentalHealth
#Nurseforce
#OKToAsk2018
#RANZCOG18
#ResearchIntoPolicy
#VHAawards
#VMIACAwards18
#WISPC18
2019 Conferences
#ACEM19
#CPHCE19
#EquallyWellAust
#GiantSteps19
#HealthAdvocacyWIM
#KTthatWorks
#LowitjaConf2019
#MHAgeing
#NNF2019
#OKtoAsk2019
#RANZCOG19
#RANZCP2019
#ruralhealthconf
#VMIAC2019
#WHOcollabAHPRA
Croakey Professional Services archive
#CommunityControl Twitter Festival
Croakey projects archive
#IndigenousHealthSummit
#IndigenousNCDs
#JustClimate
#JustJustice
Croakey register of influence
Croakey Register of Influencers in Public Health
Croakey Register of Unreleased Documents
Naked Doctor
Poems of Public Health
Summer Reading 2016-2017
Summer Reading 2017-2018
The Koori Woman
Wonky Health
CroakeyGO archive 2017 – 2018
CroakeyGo 2017
#CroakeyGO Adelaide 2017
#CroakeyGO Melbourne 2017
#CroakeyGO Newcastle 2017
#CroakeyGO Sydney 2017
CroakeyGo 2018
#CroakeyGO #QuantumWords 2018
#CroakeyGO #VicVotes 2018
#CroakeyGO Albury 2018
#CroakeyGO Callan Park 2018
#CroakeyGO Carnarvon 2018
#CroakeyGO Marrickville 2018
#CroakeyGO Palm Island 2018
Elections and Budgets 2013 – 2019
#AusVotesHealth Twitter Festival 2019
#Health4NSW
#HealthElection16
Federal Budget 2009-2010
Federal Budget 2010
Federal Budget 2011
Federal Budget 2012-2013
Federal Budget 2013-14
Federal Budget 2014-15
Federal Budget 2015-16
Federal Budget 2016-17
Federal Budget 2017/18
Federal Budget 2018-19
Federal Election 2010
Federal Election 2013
Federal Election 2016
Federal Election 2019
NSW Election 2015
NSW Election 2019
NT Election 2016
Qld Election 2015
Victorian Election 2014
WA election 2021
Support non-profit public interest journalism
Search
Generic filters
Filter by Categories
@WePublicHealth2021
#CroakeyLIVE #Budget2021Health
#MHReform
#OutOfTheBox
#QldVotesHealth
#RCIADIC30Years
#RuralHealthJustice
#TRIPSwaiver
2021 Floods
Budget2020Health
Bushfires
codesign
community control
COVID-19
Croakey Conference News Service
#2020ResearchExcellence
#21OPCC
#BackToTheFire
#ChoosingWisely2022
#FoodGovernance2021
#GiantSteps21
#Govern4Health
#GreenHealthForum21
#HealthClimateSolutions21
#HealthReImagined
#HearMe21
#IndigenousClimateJustice21
#NNF2021
#RANZCP2021
#RANZCP2022
#RTP22
#SAHeapsUnfair
#ShiftingGearsSummit
#ValueBasedCare
#WCepi2021
#YHFSummit
Equally Well 2022 Symposium
GiantSteps22
Croakey Professional Services
#CommunityControl
#COVIDthinktank21
#KidneyCareTogether
ACSQHC series
ACSQHC series 2019
ACSQHC series 2020
ACSQHC series 2021
ACSQHC series 2022
CATSINaM 25 Years
Lowitja Indigenous knowledge translation series
Croakey projects
@WePublicHealth
@WePublicHealth2020
@WePublicHealth2022
#CommunityMatters
#CoveringClimateNow
#CroakeyLIVE #USvotesHealth
#CroakeyREAD
#CroakeyVOICES
#CroakeyYOUTH
#HealthyCOP26
#HousingJusticeAus
#JusticeCOVID
#LookingLocal
#MRFFtransparency
#OutOfPocket
#TalkingTeeth
AroundTheTraps
Caring for the Frontline
COVID SNAPS
COVIDglobalMHseries
Croakey longreads
CroakeyEXPLORE
Gavin Mooney
Inside Story
Journal Watch
PIJ Commissions 2020
PIJ Commissions 2022
Summer Reading 2019-2020
The Conversation
The Health Wrap
TOO MUCH of a Good Thing
CroakeyGO
#CroakeyGO #NavigatingHealth
#GamblingHarms
#HeatwaveHealth
Mapping CroakeyGo
CroakeyNews
Cultural determinants of health
Digital platforms
Elections and budgets
Federal Budget 2019-20
Federal Budget 2020-21
Federal Budget 2022-23
Federal Election 2022
SA election 2022
Federal Budget 2021-22
Global health and climate change
2019-20 climate bushfire emergency
asylum seeker and refugee health
Climate emergency
disasters
Ebola
extreme weather events
flooding 2011
Flooding 2022
Global health
NHS
NSW 2022
NZ Election 2017
WHO
health
Health workers
Healthcare and health reform
abortion
adverse events
Aged care
Allied healthcare
Australian Medical Association
cancer
cardiovascular disease
child health
Choosing Wisely
chronic diseases
co-payments
Cochrane Collaboration
complementary medicines
conflicts of interest
death and dying
diabetes
digital technology
disabilities
e-health
emergency departments and care
Equally Well
euthanasia
evidence-based issues
general practice
genetics
health & medical marketing
health and medical education
health and medical research
Health Care Homes
health ethics
health financing and costs
Health reform
health regulation
health workforce
HIV/AIDS
hospitals
HRT
infectious diseases
influenza
international medical graduates
journal articles
LGBTIQ
medical marijuana
Medicare Locals
men's health
Mental health
MyHospitals website
National Commission of Audit 2014
National Health Performance Authority
naturopathy
NDIS
NHMRC
non communicable diseases
Nursing and midwifery
oral health
organ transplants
out of pocket costs
pain
palliative care
paramedics
pathology
Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme
pharmaceutical industry
pharmacy
Pregnancy and childbirth
Primary Health Networks
Primary healthcare
private health insurance
Rural and remote health
Safety and quality of healthcare
screening
sexual health
Social media and healthcare
suicide
surgery
swine flu
telehealth
tests
TGA
trauma
women's health
youth health
Indigenous health
#CTG10
#NTRC
Acknowledgement
cultural safety
Indigenous education
Lowitja Institute
NT Intervention
social and emotional wellbeing
Uluru Statement
WA community closures
News about Croakey
PIJ Commissions 2021
Public health and population health
#PreventiveHealthStrategy
#UnmetNeedsinPublicHealth
air pollution
alcohol
consumer health matters
COVIDwrap
environmental health
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD)
food and nutrition
gambling
Government 2.0
gun control
health communications
health impact assessment
Health in All Policies
Health inequalities
health literacy
human rights
illicit drugs
injuries
legal issues
marriage equality
Media Doctor Australia
media-related issues
nanny state
National Preventive Health Agency
obesity
occupational health
physical activity
plain packaging
prevention
Public health
Public interest journalism
road safety
sport
sugar tax
tobacco control
transport
vaccination
violence
Web 2.0
weight loss products
Royal Commission
Social determinants of health
commercial determinants of health
discrimination
education
Housing
justice
Justice Reinvestment
NBN
Newstart
poverty
Racism
social policy
Summer reading 2020-2021
Summer reading 2021-2022
Tasmanian election 2021
The Croakey Archives
#cripcroakey
#HealthEquity16
#HealthMatters
#IHMayDay (all years)
#IHMayDay 2014
#IHMayDay15
#IHMayday16
#IHMayDay17
#IHMayDay18
#LoveRural 2014
Croakey Conference News Service 2013 – 2019
2013 conferences
Australian Centre for Health Services Innovation Forum 2013
Australian Health Promotion Association Conference 2013
Closing the Credibility Gap 2013
CRANAplus Conference 2013
FASD Conference 2013
Health Workforce Australia 2013
International Health Literacy Network Conference 2013
NACCHO Summit 2013
National Rural Health Conference 2013
Oceania EcoHealth Symposium 2013
PHAA conference 2013
2014 conferences
#IPCHIV14
AIDA Conference 2014
Congress Lowitja 2014
CRANAplus conference 2014
Cultural Solutions - Healing Foundation forum 2014
Lowitja Institute Continuous Quality Improvement conference 2014
National Suicide Prevention Conference 2014
Racism and children/youth health symposium 2014
Rural & Remote Health Scientific Symposium 2014
2015 conferences
#CPHCEforum
#CRANAplus15
#HSR15
#NRHC15
#OTCC15
Population Health Congress 2015
2016 conferences
#AHHAsim16
#AHMRC16
#ANROWS2016
#ATSISPEP
#AusCanIndigenousWellness
#cphce2016
#CPHCEforum16
#CRANAplus2016
#IAMRA2016
#LowitjaConf2016
#PreventObesity16
#TowardsRecovery
#VMIAC16
#WearablesCEH
#WICC2016
2017 conferences
#17APCC
#ACEM17
#AIDAconf2017
#BTH20
#CATSINaM17
#ClimateHealthStrategy
#IAHAConf17
#IDS17
#LBQWHC17
#LivingOurWay
#OKtoAskAu
#OTCC2017
#ResearchTranslation17
#TheMHS2017
#VMIACConf17
#WCPH2017
Australian Palliative Care Conference
2018 conferences
#6rrhss
#ACEM18
#AHPA2018
#ATSISPC18
#CPHCE
#MHED18
#NDISMentalHealth
#Nurseforce
#OKToAsk2018
#RANZCOG18
#ResearchIntoPolicy
#VHAawards
#VMIACAwards18
#WISPC18
2019 Conferences
#ACEM19
#CPHCE19
#EquallyWellAust
#GiantSteps19
#HealthAdvocacyWIM
#KTthatWorks
#LowitjaConf2019
#MHAgeing
#NNF2019
#OKtoAsk2019
#RANZCOG19
#RANZCP2019
#ruralhealthconf
#VMIAC2019
#WHOcollabAHPRA
Croakey Professional Services archive
#CommunityControl Twitter Festival
Croakey projects archive
#IndigenousHealthSummit
#IndigenousNCDs
#JustClimate
#JustJustice
Croakey register of influence
Croakey Register of Influencers in Public Health
Croakey Register of Unreleased Documents
Naked Doctor
Poems of Public Health
Summer Reading 2016-2017
Summer Reading 2017-2018
The Koori Woman
Wonky Health
CroakeyGO archive 2017 – 2018
CroakeyGo 2017
#CroakeyGO Adelaide 2017
#CroakeyGO Melbourne 2017
#CroakeyGO Newcastle 2017
#CroakeyGO Sydney 2017
CroakeyGo 2018
#CroakeyGO #QuantumWords 2018
#CroakeyGO #VicVotes 2018
#CroakeyGO Albury 2018
#CroakeyGO Callan Park 2018
#CroakeyGO Carnarvon 2018
#CroakeyGO Marrickville 2018
#CroakeyGO Palm Island 2018
Elections and Budgets 2013 – 2019
#AusVotesHealth Twitter Festival 2019
#Health4NSW
#HealthElection16
Federal Budget 2009-2010
Federal Budget 2010
Federal Budget 2011
Federal Budget 2012-2013
Federal Budget 2013-14
Federal Budget 2014-15
Federal Budget 2015-16
Federal Budget 2016-17
Federal Budget 2017/18
Federal Budget 2018-19
Federal Election 2010
Federal Election 2013
Federal Election 2016
Federal Election 2019
NSW Election 2015
NSW Election 2019
NT Election 2016
Qld Election 2015
Victorian Election 2014
WA election 2021

As harmful food systems undermine our health, what are the pathways to transformative change?

Introduction by Croakey: A global conference has highlighted the health, social and environmental impacts of food governance and its role in contributing to food insecurity, malnutrition, obesity, health and economic inequalities, climate change and environmental degradation around the world.

The conference brought together people from a range of disciplines, including public health, law, Indigenous studies, environment, agriculture, nutrition, economics and human rights, to look at the drivers of food systems and to identify levers for change.

Modern systems of capitalism, which have facilitated the growing power of transnational corporations, and the enduring impacts of colonisation and racism were identified as key drivers of unhealthy food governance across the globe.

These are complex issues with no quick fixes, but the conference revealed some common areas of agreement on the domains in which action needs to occur, and highlighted successful initiatives at local and national levels.

The conference also heard about the importance of decolonising food systems and governance, and that recent international agreements provide some promise of achieving a more equitable, sustainable and inclusive approach to food governance.

The conference was supported by the Food Governance Node at the Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney; the Global Center for Legal Innovation on Food Environments housed at the O’Neill Institute for National & Global Health Law at Georgetown University; and The George Institute for Global Health.

Below, Jennifer Doggett reports for the Croakey Conference News Service. On Twitter, follow #FoodGovernance2021, and also this Twitter list of participants.


Jennifer Doggett writes:

Global food policy has enormous implications for global health and is a key driver of multiple and intersecting health, social and environmental problems.

These problems are not new but have become increasingly urgent due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which has highlighted the fragility of global food systems and increased inequalities both between and within countries.

A keynote speaker from the International Food Policy Research Institute, Dr Namukolo Covic, told delegates that more than three billion people cannot afford a healthy diet.

Dr Jamie Morrison from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) said that over the course of the COVID pandemic, an additional 80-130 million people have been added to the world’s hungry and the number of countries with hunger hotspots has grown to 20.

This increase in hunger is adding to the already disproportionate burden of non-communicable diseases experienced by low and middle income countries (LMICs). In contrast, COVID-19 has fuelled a rise in obesity in many developed countries – which also increases vulnerability to COVID.

In welcoming delegates to the conference, Michael Bloomberg, whose philanthropic organisation includes a food policy program, drew connections between these and other aspects of pandemic resilience and food governance, saying: “More equitable food systems lead to better health outcomes so we will be in better shape when the next pandemic hits.”

Presenters described how the COVID pandemic has affected agrifood systems globally, including impacting the livelihoods and food security of millions of local farmers, providers, retailers and consumers.

Morrison said the economic impact of the agrifood system was so significant, employing one billion people worldwide and indirectly supporting another 3.5 billion, that engagement with this sector was crucial to progress the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

A recurring theme of the conference was that achieving broader social and environmental goals relies on reforming current food systems and that this cannot be achieved without looking at the underlying factors that shape modern political economies, including capitalism and colonisation.

“Public health apocalypses”

The role of modern capitalism in driving public health crises was highlighted in a keynote conversation between Professor Amandine Garde, Professor of Law at the University of Liverpool, and Professor Nicholas Freudenberg, Distinguished Professor at the City University of New York School of Public Health.
Freudenberg described how 21st century capitalism has contributed to food insecurity and other public health crises through:

  • deregulation of global markets
  • corporate ownership of science
  • monopoly concentrations in food markets which reduce the power of government and citizens.

He said these factors have resulted in a system of corporately managed globalisation, leading to supply chain problems, inequitable trade arrangements and restrictive intellectual property regimes.

These are compounded by financial systems that favour short term profits, deregulation and privatisation over environmental protections and public health.

Freudenberg challenged attendees to ask, “What are the drivers of this and what can stop it?” in order to “create political, scientific and administrative processes to transform our food system”.

Freudenberg and other speakers identified three issues relevant to food governance that are a direct result of modern capitalism: the growth in ultra-processed foods; the increasing power of corporations; and the relationship between food systems and poverty.

Ultra-processed foods

Freudenberg described how 21st century capitalism has facilitated the growth of ultra-processed food because they are:

  • easy to ship and store
  • easy to market
  • dependent on a small number of commodities, (wheat sugar, palm oil)
  • hyper-palatable, habituating ensuring lifetime customers.

He discussed how ultra-processed foods have become a driver of racial inequities in health, leading to rises in cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes in lower and middle income countries (LMICs) and in populations of colour in affluent countries.

Dr Carlos Monteiro, Professor of Nutrition and Public Health at the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil and member of the WHO Nutrition Guidance Expert Advisory Group, discussed his work on the NOVA classification system for processed foods, which has been critical in informing policies in this area.

Monteiro discussed how the modern, globalised food system has moved away from using food processing techniques to preserve foods and to make preparation easier, towards a focus on maximising profits by creating hyper-palatable and convenient food products that are grossly inferior imitations of minimally processed foods and freshly prepared dishes and meals.

He attributes much of the growth in obesity, type 2 diabetes and related diseases to the increased consumption of ultra-processed food, which he said has pushed the health systems of many countries to breaking point.

Both Monteiro and Freudenberg identified modern capitalism as a key driver of the growth in ultra-processed foods and stressed that there was no magic bullet to solve this issue.

Freudenberg highlighted the role of social movements in driving changes to current food systems, including farm workers’ movements, students fighting for better food, environmentalists linking food and climate justice’ and family practice doctors calling for grassroots changes in their communities.

“We need to forge a policy agenda including reducing global consolidation of the food industry, improving the pay and working conditions of food workers, protecting and strengthening democracy and finding synergies between healthy diets and a healthy planet,” he said.

Corporate power

Dr Tlaleng Mofokeng, Special Rapporteur on the Right to Health at the United Nations, highlighted how corporations exert significant power over the diets of people all over the world.

She described how this influence is the result of well-resourced and sustained efforts by food and beverage industry to design beverages which are hyper-palatable and marketable.

Mofokeng said corporations have focussed their influence on the global south as profits decline in the global north due to policy and regulatory actions taken by governments of more affluent countries.

She also criticised corporations for hiding behind donations to charities and corporate social responsibility activities while they continue to contribute to health, social and environmental problems.

Mofokeng argued that decolonising global food governance is required to reduce the influence of corporations and systems of power, which she said causes “capitalistic violence on communities”.

A human rights-based approach to reducing the influence of the global food industry was taken by Professor Amandine Garde, Director of the Law and Non-Communicable Diseases Research Unit at the University of Liverpool.

Garde discussed her research demonstrating that self-regulation of the food industry has failed and argued that government regulation is crucial to reduce the power of corporations.

Garde argued that states should be accountable under human rights law and required to report to human rights bodies on their approach to food policy.

She also stated that the United Nations should be accountable for documenting the impact of corporations, as under the UN guiding principles businesses have a responsibility to respect human rights.

“People affected by these policies should drive policies and regulations, not corporations,” she said.

Address poverty

The intersection between food governance and wealth was discussed in a number of conference presentations.

One example of how economic status can impact diet even in wealthy countries came from Meron Lewis, a PhD candidate from the University of Queensland. Her study found that less than four percent of Australians consume a healthy diet but that this figure drops significantly for children in low socioeconomic status communities.

Lewis’s research used the healthy diets “ASAP protocol” to compare the cost of a healthy diet to the actual food intake of a range of people.

She found that people on low incomes had a similar energy intake level, compared with the general population, but that a greater proportion of their energy intake came from their favourite unhealthy food.

Her research emphasises the importance of an equity lens to better target dietary guidelines for people in low SES groups and highlights the need for urgent policy action to help improve affordability of recommended diets.

In Australia, this could include maintaining the GST-free status of fresh food and increasing the GST on unhealthy food.

Decolonisation

Decolonisation was a major theme of the conference. Speakers described how current systems of food governance privilege white norms and values, and reinforce the power relations of colonisation while marginalising Black people, Indigenous people, and People of Colour.

Dr Tlaleng Mofokeng said that no conversation about food governance would be complete without a discussion of decolonisation, racism and power asymmetries.

She described how colonial legacies have generational impacts on food security, due to dispossession from land which creates a nutrition vacuum and forces people to buy less nutritious processed food.

Key strategies identified at the conference included: participatory and inclusive forms of food governance, the inclusion of Indigenous knowledges and a focus on diverse voices and co-design.

Indigenous knowledge

The conference heard that prior to colonisation, Indigenous peoples cared for Country and had innovative and sustainable food systems.

This changed with the colonisation, which introduced refined sugars, starches and salt into traditional diets, leading to increased chronic diseases among Indigenous populations worldwide.

Speakers also highlighted the importance of having connection to traditional food practices for psychological and social wellbeing.

A number of examples were given of Indigenous knowledges being incorporated into global food governance, including efforts by the UN Committee on Food Security to incorporate Indigenous knowledges.

An Australian example of how Indigenous knowledges and practices can inform food governance practices was provided by PhD student, Beau Cubillo, a Larrakia and Wadjigan researcher from the Northern Territory.

Cubillo described how seafood is not just a source of nourishment for Aboriginal people but is incorporated in social domains of identity and culture, with cultural fishing rights seen as important as land rights.

Cubillo’s research has focussed on the Aboriginal fishing enterprise in Maningrida and used Indigenous methodologies, such as yarning circles, as well as field trips and interviews with informants.

His project explores the relationships between Indigenous health and wellbeing and seafood in an Indigenous knowledge domain though a multidimensional approach. This included localised documentation and representation of Indigenous knowledges of the nutritional health and wellbeing benefits, values and meanings of seafood, and nutritional analysis of fish and seafood species.

The research will contribute new knowledge to ensure the development of Indigenous fisheries is sensitive to health, nutritional and wellbeing values and meanings of culturally important seafood, he said.

Cubillo highlighted the importance of knowledge held by Elders who have lived experience of how seafood has been used for food, art and medicine. He also discussed the stress experienced by Elders if this knowledge is lost.

Cubillo stressed the importance of co-design in researching food issues impacting Indigenous people and called for greater recognition of the broad health and nutritional benefits of food policies, such as access to country, reduced barriers of access and knowledge transfer.

Other presentations highlighted the need for more Indigenous researchers and policy makers.

As an example, Dr Mark Lock, Casual Research Fellow at Deakin University, said that he was unusual as an Indigenous person doing systematic reviews, and that “Equity in the food environment requires equity in the research process”.

Dr Jennifer Browne, research fellow at Deakin University, pointed out that reviews undertaken by Indigenous researchers are important in uncovering food system issues that were not understood before, such as the stigma associated with using the Basics Card and the racism experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in supermarkets and when trying to access nutrition education.

While presenters identified some areas of progress, Associate Professor Renzo Guinto from St Luke’s College of Medicine pointed out that Indigenous voices are on still the margins of many debates relevant to food governance, including debates about climate change.

Taking action

The conference heard about recent initiatives that are attempting to change food governance, at the local, national and international levels.

While there are some clear areas of progress, presenters acknowledged major challenges remain in coordinating actions across jurisdictions and sectors, and in addressing joint health, economic, social and environmental goals.

The role of recent international events, such as the UN Food Systems Summit and COP 26, were discussed in a number of presentations and panel discussions.

Professor Boyd Swinburn, from the University of Auckland, expressed scepticism about the role of large international summits in driving meaningful changes. However, Morrison said if done well, they can help raise issues and build consensus around what’s important.

Morrison described how the UN Summit had been forced to follow a different process due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

He said that the process used –  including a series of national dialogues in 148 countries globally, supplemented by over 1000 other dialogues – helped generate a paradigm shift on how important food systems are in supporting inclusiveness and democracy.

One positive outcome of this process is that 109 countries have articulated pathways to take their food systems forward. Morrison commented that even though there are implementation challenges with these pathways, this is still a positive step.

Morrison argued that the UN Summit demonstrated that we need to be simultaneously achieving different outcomes. For example, the Coalition on Zero Hunger looks at actions which are more environmentally sustainable, climate sensitive and those which would generate greater levels of income for those more vulnerable in the food system.

While presenters felt that COP26 was less successful in addressing food systems issues, Morrison said he was encouraged to see they were debated more this year than at previous COPs, and felt a willingness among participants to focus more on food at COP 27 next year.

He mentioned two important agreements relevant to food governance arising from COP 26: The Glasgow Leaders Declaration on Forests and Land Use; and the Global Methane Pledge between the European Union and the USA to curb methane emissions by 30 percent by 2030.

However, he also noted challenges to improving food governance systems at the global level, including the large number of poorly coordinated international organisations involved and the inconsistent views between countries about the role these organisations should play.

Carlos Monteiro said the Summit was a “unique opportunity to urge countries to implement policy interventions required to reduce ultra-processed food production, distribution and consumption, while simultaneously making fresh or minimally processed foods more available, accessible and affordable”.

Despite some success in addressing ultra-processed food issues, Monteiro acknowledged that the Summit could have done better in involving and listening to global voices.

Local matters

While many participants supported a greater role for international approaches to reforms of food systems, including calling for formal agreements similar to those governing in international trade, a presentation from Dr Lana Elliot, from the Queensland University of Technology, challenged this strategy.

Elliot discussed the implementation of a sugar sweetened beverages tax (SSBT) in Fiji and Vanuatu, and questioned whether its introduction reflected the priorities of the local communities or was pushed by global actors with little knowledge of local needs.

Her research found that the SSBT had very little impact on the health of the Fijian and Vanuatuan communities but came at a high opportunity cost due to their small population and constrained resources.

Elliot stressed the need to contextualise policy responses, arguing that what works in big countries may not be appropriate in smaller places.

Rather than a SSBT, she suggested that reducing the cost of locally grown fruit and vegetables would have been more effective in increasing the quality of food available to local communities in Fiji and Vanuatu.

Ways forward

There may be no simple strategies to address the growing need for global food governance reform, but the conference clearly identified the key ingredients of successful reform processes.

These include:

  • understanding the political economy of food systems
  • building coalitions across sectors
  • including Indigenous knowledges and perspectives
  • harnessing the power of broader social movements
  • focusing on equity and inclusivity
  • working towards multiple aims simultaneously: nutrition, environmental, social and economic.

The importance of individual action was also stressed by Dr Namukolo Covic, Senior Research Coordinator at the International Food Policy Research Institute, who said:

Each one of us can do something different today.

It does not have to be a grand idea – I can start by what I choose to put on my plate.

I can do my bit and collectively we can make a difference.”


More from Twitter


Keynote Speech: Decolonising Global Food Governance
Dr Tlaleng Mofokeng


Keynote conversation: Professor Amandine Garde and Professor Nick Freudenberg


Bookmark this link to track our ongoing coverage of the conference.


 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Search by: Categories or tags

Search
Generic filters
Filter by Categories
@WePublicHealth2021
#CroakeyLIVE #Budget2021Health
#MHReform
#OutOfTheBox
#QldVotesHealth
#RCIADIC30Years
#RuralHealthJustice
#TRIPSwaiver
2021 Floods
Budget2020Health
Bushfires
codesign
community control
COVID-19
Croakey Conference News Service
#2020ResearchExcellence
#21OPCC
#BackToTheFire
#ChoosingWisely2022
#FoodGovernance2021
#GiantSteps21
#Govern4Health
#GreenHealthForum21
#HealthClimateSolutions21
#HealthReImagined
#HearMe21
#IndigenousClimateJustice21
#NNF2021
#RANZCP2021
#RANZCP2022
#RTP22
#SAHeapsUnfair
#ShiftingGearsSummit
#ValueBasedCare
#WCepi2021
#YHFSummit
Equally Well 2022 Symposium
GiantSteps22
Croakey Professional Services
#CommunityControl
#COVIDthinktank21
#KidneyCareTogether
ACSQHC series
ACSQHC series 2019
ACSQHC series 2020
ACSQHC series 2021
ACSQHC series 2022
CATSINaM 25 Years
Healthdirect Australia series 2019
Lowitja Indigenous knowledge translation series
Croakey projects
@WePublicHealth
@WePublicHealth2020
@WePublicHealth2022
#CommunityMatters
#CoveringClimateNow
#CroakeyLIVE #USvotesHealth
#CroakeyREAD
#CroakeyVOICES
#CroakeyYOUTH
#HealthyCOP26
#HousingJusticeAus
#JusticeCOVID
#LookingLocal
#MRFFtransparency
#OutOfPocket
#TalkingTeeth
AroundTheTraps
Caring for the Frontline
COVID SNAPS
COVIDglobalMHseries
Croakey longreads
CroakeyEXPLORE
Gavin Mooney
Inside Story
Journal Watch
PIJ Commissions 2020
PIJ Commissions 2022
Summer Reading 2019-2020
The Conversation
The Health Wrap
TOO MUCH of a Good Thing
CroakeyGO
#CroakeyGO #NavigatingHealth
#GamblingHarms
#HeatwaveHealth
Mapping CroakeyGo
CroakeyNews
Cultural determinants of health
Digital platforms
Elections and budgets
Federal Budget 2019-20
Federal Budget 2020-21
Federal Budget 2022-23
Federal Election 2022
SA election 2022
Federal Budget 2021-22
Global health and climate change
2019-20 climate bushfire emergency
asylum seeker and refugee health
Climate emergency
disasters
Ebola
extreme weather events
flooding 2011
Flooding 2022
Global health
NHS
NSW 2022
NZ Election 2017
WHO
health
Health workers
Healthcare and health reform
abortion
adverse events
Aged care
Allied healthcare
Australian Medical Association
cancer
cardiovascular disease
child health
Choosing Wisely
chronic diseases
co-payments
Cochrane Collaboration
complementary medicines
conflicts of interest
death and dying
diabetes
digital technology
disabilities
e-health
emergency departments and care
Equally Well
euthanasia
evidence-based issues
general practice
genetics
health & medical marketing
health and medical education
health and medical research
Health Care Homes
health ethics
health financing and costs
Health reform
health regulation
health workforce
HIV/AIDS
hospitals
HRT
infectious diseases
influenza
international medical graduates
journal articles
LGBTIQ
medical marijuana
Medicare Locals