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7 Comments

  1. 1
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    fredex

    I’m mildly confident something vaguely similar was included in past editions of “The Social Atlas” that comes from census data.
    Worth checking and last time I looked [yonks ago] it was a fascinating document for all sorts of reasons.

    Reply
  2. 2
    Croakey

    Croakey

    Thanks for the tip, which found me this A Social Health Atlas 2008: http://www.publichealth.gov.au/interactive-mapping/all-states%10-territories_-aust./a-social-health-atlas-of-australia-third-edition_-2008-%5Bonline%5D.html

    But I am finding it very difficult to decipher. Is there an idiot’s guide or something similar for how to make sense of it?

    Melissa

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  3. 3
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    FrogDoc

    You have also got a more recent one (2010) http://www.publichealth.gov.au/interactive_mapping/aust_multiple_online_2010/aust/atlas.html

    An Interested UK resident

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  4. 4
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    Kris

    It’s not national, but there are some indicators available by LGA for NSW in the CHO report (static, not interactive though):
    http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/publichealth/chorep/toc/list_lgamapindex.asp#lgamap

    It would be fantastic to put together something like this nationally, although one of the big challenges from a technical point of view would be making appropriate adjustments to overcome the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modifiable_areal_unit_problem) for a large set of indicators, across a large number of areas. If you don’t do this right then I can imagine some lesser quality media outlets making a big deal out of differences that probably don’t exist.

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  5. 5
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    James

    Same software, different country: http://www.phionline.moh.govt.nz/

    Reply
  6. 6
    Croakey

    Croakey

    Thanks FrogDoc and Kris. I still had difficulty making sense of the most recent version of the social atlas. The NSW document was more useful but still a long way from the user-friendly format of the English map. I’m sure there would be many difficulties involved in creating such maps nationally, but I reckon any risk of minor differences being overblown by the media would be far outweighted by directing public/political/professional attention to disparities. My ideal national map would include data on health status, as well as the total spending (public, private) in those areas on health and education. That might be both interesting and useful…

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  7. 7
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    HelenS

    Glad you like it – and we’d be happy to talk to anyone interested in producing something similar. (Please contact us through the website, http://www.healthprofiles.info ).

    We’re looking for people to help tell us what presentations are most user-friendly – so you’re welcome to join our User Panel – you can do this through the short survey on the homepage. Feedback and any suggestions also welcome.

    There are many other population health tools available from the Association of Public Health Observatories (not laboratories!) – all via http://www.apho.org.uk

    HelenS, project manager on behalf of the Health Profiles team

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