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    Michelle Imison

    Although the evidence is not yet in on the long-term health and economic effects, the increase in absolute numbers of cyclists in Sydney’s CBD as a result of the City of Sydney’s presently much-protested (mainly by those who don’t use them) cycleways can likely only be to the public health good: decreased congestion, more active transport and fewer vehicle-related deaths and injuries.

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    Margo

    The way public health decision-making works in Australia makes US-style approaches difficult. A Bloomberg or a Tom Frieden or even a Boston Health Commission (which has also done some great things) would find that anything they wanted to do would be hamstrung by long, drawn-out political debate, enquiries, lobbying by vested economic interests, etc.
    If I had to nominate someone, however, I’d have to nominate former ACT Health Minister Wayne Berry, for his commitment to Australia’s first smoke-free public places and workplaces legislation in the early 1990s. It’s easy to forget how incredibly controversial this was at the time and how much pressure there was from the (tobacco indusdtry-backed) hospitality industry and others.

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