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    Ben Harris-Roxas

    Apart from just the funding being contested are the messages becoming somewhat muddled?

    An acquaintance recently told me that she’d decided to keep smoking because she gained weight when she quit, and she steadfastly believed that being overweight was worse for her health than smoking (even citing the Commonwealth’s waist circumference social marketing as evidence of this). The mind boggles…

    Obviously that’s just an isolated anecdote but is it reflective of the funding issue Lesley discuses as well – can people only prioritise one prevention issue at a time? I’d be interested in any insights others may have.

    In response to Melissa’s query, I can’t recall hearing anything about prevention strategies as part of Australia’s stimulus package. Maybe preventative health activities would have been seen to be slow to have a short-term economic effect?

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    Rorschach

    There are some data suggesting that when tobacco prices go up, people don’t stop smoking, but instead make cuts to things like buying proper food, or giving to charities.It’s not the answer.

    Maybe preventative health activities would have been seen to be slow to have a short-term economic effect?

    I don’t hear anything in the election campaign about preventative health, all we’re ever doing is trying to stomp out the fires that are already burning.

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