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flooding 2011
global health
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Healthcare and health reform
abortion
adverse events
aged care
allied health care
Australian Medical Association
cancer
cardiovascular disease
child health
Choosing Wisely
chronic diseases
co-payments
Cochrane Collaboration
complementary medicines
conflicts of interest
death and dying
diabetes
digital technology
disabilities
e-health
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euthanasia
evidence-based issues
general practice
genetics
health & medical marketing
health and medical education
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health ethics
health financing and costs
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hospitals
HRT
infectious diseases
influenza
international medical graduates
journal articles
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medical marijuana
Medicare Locals
men's health
mental health
MyHospitals website
National Commission of Audit 2014
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naturopathy
NDIS
NHMRC
non communicable diseases
nurses and nursing
oral health
organ transplants
out of pocket costs
pain
palliative care
paramedics
pathology
Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme
pharmaceutical industry
pharmacy
Pregnancy and childbirth
primary health care
Primary Health Networks
private health insurance
quality and safety of health care
rural and remote health
screening
sexual health
social media and healthcare
suicide
surgery
swine flu
telehealth
tests
TGA
trauma
women's health
youth health
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#CTG10
#NTRC
Acknowledgement
cultural safety
Indigenous education
Lowitja Institute
NT Intervention
social and emotional wellbeing
Uluru Statement
WA community closures
News about Croakey
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#PreventiveHealthStrategy
#UnmetNeedsinPublicHealth
air pollution
alcohol
consumer health matters
COVIDwrap
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Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD)
food and nutrition
gambling
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gun control
health communications
health impact assessment
Health in All Policies
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injuries
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media-related issues
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Croakey Conference News Service 2013 – 2019
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Wonky Health
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2019 Archive

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]9 December

This week, the @IPCHealth_au team covered #HeatwaveHealth and a related #CroakeyGO. See a summary of the tweets here.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]2 December

This week, the @CroakeyNews team previewed the #CroakeyGO on #HeatwaveHealth.

 [/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]25 November

Keziah Bennett-Brook – @Keziah_bb – Manager of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Program at The George Institute for Global Health covered the 14th Australasian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference, at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre, Brisbane, Australia, 25 – 27 November 2019.

With a theme of Pushing the Boundaries, this conference challenged the traditional injury prevention paradigms to examine future disruptions and opportunities for injury prevention. This was explored through innovative technologies and changing digital societies, and new multisectoral strategies for partnerships across government portfolios, clinicians, practitioners, industry, researchers and community.

 

 [/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]18 November

Australian Indigenous Health InfoNet shared numerous resources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ health, using the hashtag #YourHealthInfoNet.

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]11 November

Dr George Crisp – @DrGCrisp – a Perth doctor, who lectures and writes on environmental health, air pollution, and climate change, is covering the #ClimateCrisis.
[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]4 November

Researcher Elissa Elvidge – @ElissaElvidge – covered the @LIME__Network conference in Aeotearoa: Pouhine Poutama Embedding Indigenous Health Education conference. LIME is the Leaders in Indigenous Medical Education  Network, and supports teaching and learning of Indigenous health in medical and health education. Elissa is a PhD candidate developing an Aboriginal Cultural Safety and Security Framework for NSW hospitals.

Dr Kelvin Kong: Described some of the main challenges – current focus is on growing & building capacity of Indigenous workforce. Also the need to create an organisational culture that supports and encourages individuals 2 provide more #CulturalSafe and responsive care

There is a need 4 organisations 2 look in the mirror and reflect on what they represent and what they r trying to achieve. By having a power base of Indigenous members who are able 2 take part in important conversations in a meaningful way #CriticalConsciousness #CulturalSafety

Part of this requires recognising & addressing the privilege & inequity that occurs in the application process. Helping Indigenous Drs 2 navigate those governance processes. + recent inclusion of specific Indigenous health competency! Embedding #CulturalSafety in2 curriculum

Tweets from the presentation above:

#CulturalSafety is more nuanced as it centres on power differentials b/t patients & practitioners particularly if they r from a marginalised community. It is defined by the recipient of care & can change depending on context. Being open2 teachable moments

Requires an understanding of whiteness, equity, institutional racism & intersectionality. Health care providers should be willing 2 be reflexive & responsive 2 patient & family needs. Willing 2 engage in critical self reflection = critical consciousness.

Tweets from the presentation above:

We as teachers need 2 help them 2 develop & learn from that discomfort in order 2 unravel those feeling & relate them 2 the real world experiences of marginalised & oppressed people. Humility & self reflection r important skills 4 clinicians #TeachableMoment #CulturalSafety

Self reflection & alterity r important skills- e.g when giving patient & families bad news or asking 4 sensitive information= more effective empathetic communication. Studies show it also benefits clinicians with debriefing & encourages resilience + quality care

Do Not apologise the discomfort -prepare them for it & acknowledge it. We can let them choose their own level of discomfort- each will have unique experiences that they bring- starting points individual / reactions/ reflections. That’s ok & necessary part of learning

There is also a need 2 teach staff #CulturalSafety– if students are getting conflicting messages about Indigenous people then what they learn becomes diluted and confusing. Education should be top down in order 2 be effective.

Hospital staff need education2 – if new graduates go into faccilites and the environment and culture arround them is racist- these teachings will become lost. 4 #CulturalSafety 2 be effectively embeded vertical and horizontal learning is required.

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]28 October

Croakey Conference News Service journalist Marie McInerney covered the three-day Listen Up, Listen Louder conference, hosted by the Victorian Mental Illness Awareness Council (VMIAC), the state’s peak consumer body. It was a timely event, coinciding with interim reports from both the Productivity Commission inquiry into mental health and the Royal Commission into aged care. As well, Victoria’s Royal Commission will release its interim report in late November. See stories from #VMIAC2019. [/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]21 October

A team from @AIHI_MQ – the Australian Institute of Health Innovation – shared the news from #ISQua2019 – the 36th International Society for Quality in Health Care conference in Cape Town South Africa, with the title Innovate, implement, improve: beating the drum for safety, quality and equity.

Why is patient safety now listed as one of WHO’s top priorities? By most estimates, there’s a one in a million chance of being harmed in a plane crash—while not entirely reassuring, that figure is hardly likely to stop most people from booking a flight. But what about taking a loved one to hospital? WHO estimates that worldwide there’s a one in 300 chance of being harmed during any form of healthcare. In Australia, where we have more than 11 million hospitalisations per year, that figure is about one in ten. Researchers from the Australian Institute of Health Innovation are focussed on understanding that figure and finding ways to reduce it while also ensuring safe, equitable access to healthcare for all Australians and informing reform efforts around the world. ISQua is a member-based, not-for-profit community and organisation dedicated to promoting quality improvement in healthcare. The network includes members from more than 70 countries and 6 continents.

The Australian Institute of Health Innovation, based at Macquarie University in Sydney, has an absolute commitment to improving healthcare services and systems in Australia and beyond. We aim to create world-class, high-impact research that makes a difference for patients, health professionals and society more broadly. We are a research-intensive organisation located within the unique campus of MQ Health at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia. MQ Health is Australia’s first fully integrated academic health sciences centre, combing excellence in clinical care with teaching and research.

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]14 October

@GroundSwellAus and @PHPalCare tweeted from #PHPCI2019the 6th Public Health Palliative Care International Conference, held from 13 – 16 October in the Blue Mountains in NSW, with the title: Compassionate Communities in Action: Re-claiming Ageing, Dying and Grieving. A public health approach to end of life care views the community as an equal partner in the long and complex task of providing quality healthcare at the end of life. There is now a significant body of evidence about the public health approach, and this conference signals a new era for international research and practices. The Public Health Palliative Care International Conference brought together leading practitioners, researchers and innovators from across the world. Co-hosted by The GroundSwell Project, Western Sydney University and Public Health Palliative Care, it was the first time the conference had been held in the southern hemisphere – it recognises the innovative practices, policies and funding models that are emerging such as compassionate communities, person centred care, and primary health. The conference was timely as governments and citizens work towards the right care being provided to the right people in the right place and at the right time. [/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]7 October

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Association’s NSW board representative David Follent – @Fuzor – tweeted from the 10-year anniversary conference: ‘A Decade of Footprints, Driving Recognition’. In a first for @WePublicHealth, he was announced as the new chair of NATSIHWA during his stint as guest tweeter. Read more about the conference in this report from NATSIHWA.

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]30 September

Dr Holly Northam OAM – @hollynortham – from the University of Canberra profiled #RestorativeHealthCare. Northam brings over 30 years of clinical experience to her research and teaching practice. She has a strong social justice focus that is underpinned by her professional identity as a nurse and midwife. Her PhD study, Hope for a peaceful death and organ donation, identified that more must be done to alleviate suffering caused by communication failures in healthcare. She played an instrumental role in setting up and running the ACT Organ and Tissue Donation Service and has been recognised for her expertise in this specialisation. Northam’s research and teaching approaches are framed using the lens of hope and restorative practice to identify and support vulnerable people in health settings. [/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]23 September

This week, the @CroakeyNews team shared stories and reflections from the #CoveringClimateNow initiative:

About to wrap up our RT-ing this week of the #CoveringClimateNow news-feed with a few key articles and reflections. (But please keep following the hashtag as we and others are continuing to publish articles as part of this global media collaboration).

This story from CBS News was not part of the #CoveringClimateNow as such, but provides important context for the discussions: How North America lost nearly three billion birds over the last 50 years.

I find it hard to fathom numbers and losses like these. Where should we focus our attention/action/energy when there is so much terrible news about the state of planetary health?

The climate crisis entails so much injustice at so many levels. This is one powerful example, from Bhutan:

While the rest of the world is struggling to reduce its carbon emissions, Bhutan has long achieved and maintained its ‘carbon negative’ status. The majority of its electricity comes from hydropower, and over 70% of the country comprises protected forests.

As per the Energy and Climate Intelligence Unit’s “carbon comparator” tool, its forests absorb at least three times the amount its population emits”. But of course that does not protect the country and its people.”

On related, listen to environmentalist and former Prime Minister of Bhutan Tshering Tobgay on the devastating implications of glacier melting in the Hindu Kush Himalaya region for one-fifth of humanity.

He says:

If you can’t care for those affected by the melting of glaciers then you should at least care for yourselves…That’s because the Hindu Kush Himalaya region…is like the pulse of the planet. The entire planet will eventually suffer.”

Why should the rest of the world care? Former Prime Minister of Bhutan Tshering Tobgay raises the prospect of conflict over water, and political destabilisation in a region with three nuclear powers.

As part of the #CoveringClimateNow initiative, at Croakey, we have been seeking to bring the hashtag into wider conversations, in order to share stories/ideas/connections across different Twitter threads and groups. #ConnectiveTheory

As we did with this story: ACT upstages the federal government with low-cost carbon policy.

This story is also a reminder of the importance of having some focus on solutions in our coverage.

#CoveringClimateNow has also been an opportunity for critique, reflection and examination of media and journalism practices around the climate crisis, and it’s been informative to follow some of these conversations around the world.

As an aside, was this the best headline about the IPCC Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate? Climate change: UN panel signals red alert on ‘Blue Planet’.

The BBC reported: “In a nutshell, the waters are getting warmer, the world’s ice is melting rapidly, and these have implications for almost every living thing on the planet.”

It is clearly no time for business as usual. As you may have seen, we have launched a campaign to raise funds for public interest journalism to put a sustained focus on health and the climate crisis – please support if you can.

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]16 September

This week, a tag team of guest tweeters from the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity tweeted from #CREHealthEquity, the Centre’s final policy symposium, titled Promoting health equity: From knowing to action. They also covered #AustPH2019, the 50th anniversary conference of the Public Health Association of Australia, the #climatestrike in Adelaide, and a People’s Health Movement event, including a tribute to the late Professor David Sanders. Guest tweeters included @BelTownsend @baumfran @SharonFrielOz @drtobyfreeman. (Read more from #AustPH2019 here).

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]9 September

This week, a tag team previewed some of the key climate and health issues as part of Croakey’s contribution to #CoveringClimateNow, a global media collaboration leading up to a summit in New York City on 23 September. A PDF of the coverage can be downloaded here here.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]2 September

Hazel Bucher (@NPHazel) is a Hobart-based aged care/mental health Nurse Practitioner. She tweeted from the Australian College of Nurse Practitioners National Conference in Melbourne. https://www.acnp.org.au/conference-2019. Read more about Hazel here.

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]26 August 

This week @BronwynHemsley was in the chair for Speech Pathology Week. She is Chief Investigator of the SafetyCATCH project, for “Keeping People with Communication Disability Safe in Hospital”.

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19 August

@NTShelterInc, NT Shelter, is the Northern Territory’s peak body for affordable housing and homelessness, Our vision is appropriate and affordable housing for ALL Territorians, especially those with low income, and those particularly vulnerable and disadvantaged in the housing market.

NT Shelter will be utilising the @WePublicHealth platform to share resources and statistics about the housing+health intersects in the Territory (particularly as related to rheumatic heart disease and for dialysis patients), in the context of the homelessness crisis in the Territory – where 13,717 people are experiencing homelessness right now, at a rate of12 times the national average.

88.5% of homeless persons are Aboriginal (despite representing just one third of the Territory’s population); 83% live in severely overcrowding dwellings; and 71% live in remote communities.

In 2017-18, 4,494 people were turned away from services. And despite the highest rates of homelessness in the country, the NT receives the least amount of funding support from the Federal Government. We know that access to appropriate and affordable accommodation is critical for preventing a range of health conditions, as well as for supporting the recovery of many others.

 

 

 

 

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]12 August

The GroundSwell Project vision is that when someone is dying, caring or grieving, we all know what to do. GSP undertakes a range of community initiatives to help develop #DeathLiteracy. Every year in August Dying to Know Day (#D2KDay) is held and it’s become a people powered movement that talks about, plans for and celebrates community knowledge around death, dying and grief.  It’s become Australia’s biggest conversation about death. Hosting the @WePublic Health account, we talked about #D2KDay, #DeathLiteracy and why it matters, along with ideas on how we can all contribute to creating more compassionate communities around end of life care, including palliative care. Plus we shared some of the highlights of the upcoming Public Health Palliative Care International (#PHPCI2019) conference we are cohosting in Oct. Follow: @GroundSwellAus

 

 [/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]5 August

Dr John Hall – @JHRural – is the current President Elect of RDAA and has been the Vice President from 2014 – 2017. Dr Hall Graduated from the University of QLD in 2000. He worked as a Rural Generalist Obstetrician in Stanthorpe for 4 years before moving to Oakey as the Medical Superintendent, where he worked in that role until 2016. In 2014 Dr Hall became the sole director of the private practice in Oakey, Downs Rural Medical. DRM, employs 20 doctors across three sites including Oakey, Kingsthorpe and Toowoomba. He continues to practice as a GP Obstetrician as a VMO in St George QLD and Cooma, NSW. Dr Hall was one of the founding members of the QLD rural Generalist Pathway team. He served as RDAQ president in 2008. He is currently a director on the board of AMAQ. He has a passion for teaching the next generation of rural doctors, currently as a senior lecturer in rural medicine for Griffith and UQ. His practice currently educates doctors at all levels including medical students, hospital based residents, and GP registrars. He was an early adopter of social media, founding the RDAQ and RDAA Twitter handles @Ruraldocsq and @RuralDoctorsAus and Facebook pages, and managing them in the early years. He has a passion for rural medical research and health policy development and advocacy. John is currently studying towards his Masters of Public Health and Masters of Business Administration at JCU.

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]29 July

Adjunct Associate Professor Christopher Carter, CEO of the North Western Melbourne Primary Health Network, covered the #NavigatingHealth #CroakeyGO that was held in Melbourne on 1 August, profiling patient journeys through mental health services. Chris is a broadly skilled leader in health and primary healthcare with extensive experience in managing complexity, driving transformational change and delivering organisational outcomes. His experience encompasses strategic planning of services, service and system redesign, organisational development, redesigning and implementing new models of care or service delivery and building organisational capacity through collaboration and partnerships with a variety of organisations. Chris’ career has included work as an allied heath practitioner, an educator and policy maker, an international development and evaluation consultant, and as an advocate for young people and marginalised populations in a variety of roles. Chris’ qualifications include a Master of Business Leadership, Graduate Diploma in Health Promotion, Bachelor of Social Work, and an Executive Certificate in Leadership and Management. Read more about the #NavigatingHealth #CroakeyGo.
[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]22 July

The Mental Health Victoria’s Ageing and Mental Health Summit, held in Melbourne on 24 July, sought to put mental health firmly on the aged care reform agenda while planting aged care in the minds of mental health reformists. Dave Peters, @dPeters1977, live-tweeted the discussions, which were also reported for Croakey Conference News by Marie McInerney.

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]15 July

This week we heard about informed consent from Pip Brennan, Executive Director of the Health Consumers Council in WA (@hconcwa), an independent, not for profit organisation dedicated to ensuring the consumer voice is at the heart of health policy, service planning and review. Pip has worked in the community sector for the last 18 years. Inspired by her own experiences of the confusing maternity care system, Pip initially volunteered as a maternity consumer representative in a range of roles. She began her paid health career as an advocate working at the Health Consumers’ Council (HCC) from 2006. She has been a conciliator of health complaints, a health NGO professional and always a firm believer in the value of consumers being at the table. She took on the role of Executive Director of the Health Consumers Council in WA from 2015 and was a panel member on the state’s recent Sustainable Health Review. [/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]8 July

Based at the Indigenous Studies Unit at the University of Melbourne, provides coordinating support to organisations collecting and storing data about Indigenous Australians, and guest tweeted about Indigenous Data Sovereignty. Read more: The text below is taken from a series of detailed Twitter threads:

“Over the course of the week we will be working from the ground up, starting with a background on Indigenous data generation and management in both colonial and non-colonial settings, followed by an incremental elaboration of contemporary objectives.

Throughout this week-long elaboration on Indigenous data governance, we will be referring to a number of co-lateral issues relating to health, education, economics, justice system engagement, and cultural heritage preservation in Australia.

If at any point you would like a quick background on the @DataIndigenous initiative, please head over to our website. In particular, have a look at our Resources page, where you will find a number of accessible information sheets addressing key aspects.

In order to properly articulate the objectives of @DataIndigenous, we need first to explain what we mean by ‘Indigenous data’, and at a more general level, what we mean by ‘data’. These terms and definitions have very specific meanings.

At a very general level, in a day-to-day sense, ‘data’ has a loose meaning: A plural for ‘datum’ – some unit of information or knowledge that has been reduced to some degree of granularity. But what degree? At what point does information transform into data?

Thankfully, the answer is pretty simple: Information is transformed into data when it becomes useful to measure the *occurrence* of some part of information. This means that data emerges from information, when that information has been reduced to point that it can be *counted*.

The important part of this explanation here, is *usefulness*: We are talking about the the *utility* of counting information at a particular level of specificity. What is the point of counting ‘parts’ of information, such that data is generated as a result?

It is self-evident that different fields of expertise use information in different ways: For example, information about temperature is used by meteorologists measuring weather, but also by medical doctors in measuring responses to infection.

Variation in the utility of meteorological vs medical information about temperature correlates with variation in the the transformation of temperature *information* into temperature *data*.

We might say that we ‘feel hot’, knowing that such a statement expresses information. But *data* measuring a 40ºC temperature means something very different about that statement, depending on whether we are measuring a human body, or the weather.

Everyone generates data whenever we measure aspects of information. We learn to do this as children when we are taught how to describe our experiences using metric concepts: How hot or cold something is; how big or small; how fast or slow; how many of something we can count, etc.

A tacit understanding of how to transform information into data is a universal feature of all human language development, and of all cultures.

All cultures also maintain their own specialised languages for generating information about specific domains of experience. These include, for example, astronomy, engineering, music, art, religion, etc.

Because of distinctive histories and environmental conditions, many cultures also maintain specialised languages for generating information that is relatively unique. Obvious examples include information on how to survive in extreme environments, such as deserts, or the arctic.

One such relatively unique language, which belongs most distinctively to Europe, is that of colonialism. This is a specialised language that has developed to generate information about the invasion of foreign lands, and the seizure of other peoples’ resources.

The specialised language of colonialism, and the information to which it gives rise, is not strictly discrete, but rather assembled from a collection of other specialised languages that have subfields for generating information about Indigenous peoples.

Many of these subfields can be identified by the prefix ‘ethno-‘, e.g. ethnomusicology, ethnobotany, etc. The most specialised colonial language is that of the freestanding field of ethnography, and its elaborated form, social anthropology, also known as cultural anthropology.

In colonial contexts such as Australia, other attendant expert fields are also adapted for the purposes of ‘Indigenous Affairs’ administration, including especially health, education, economics, law, and more broadly, demography.

Cumulatively, these fields give rise to large bodies of specialised information, which in turn encode vast quantities of data about Indigenous individuals and communities.

Although this data appears to be the direct product of colonial administration, which is typically implemented by non-Indigenous people, it is in fact the property of Indigenous people from whom it is extracted, since without their input, it could not exist.

This is one type of Indigenous data. The other type is of course, that generated by Indigenous peoples independently of colonial administration, in the course of exercising autochthonous domains of expert knowledge, e.g. in astronomy, religion, art, music, economics, trade, etc.

So to conclude this thread, Indigenous data is generated both by colonial administration and by Indigenous cultural institutions, via the use of specialised languages to develop discrete domains of specialised knowledge. Data is the quantifiable tertiary product this information.

In the next thread, we will discuss the definition of data as a form of property, which underpins the international movement known as ‘Indigenous Data Sovereignty’, or #IDSov.

In this thread we will talk about the definition of data as a type of property. But before we do that, a good datum point for orienting the conversation is the edited volume ‘Indigenous Data Sovereignty: Toward an agenda’ (2016).

As outlined in this volume, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) forms a cornerstone for Indigenous Data Sovereignty concerns. Chapter 2 by Professor Megan Davis is especially pertinent to this point.

Professor Davis notes that in 2004, within the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII), “Indigenous participants identified culturally specific data and standardised data to ensure that indigenous peoples were provided with data that were *useful for them*” (2016:28).

The UNPFII argued that, “Research should be carried out in partnership with indigenous peoples” and that, “Case studies allowing for the use of both qualitative and quantitative data [would] provided a holistic view of the welfare of distinct peoples” (Ibid.).

“On the other hand, there was caution expressed that case studies could be problematic because of the paucity of standardised data to compare with the non-indigenous population” (Ibid.).

“The outcomes of the expert group meeting included the following questions relevant to data sovereignty: • For whom are we collecting data? • How do we collect the data? • What should be measured? • Who should control information? • What are the data for?” (2016:29)

Professor Davis goes on to note: “It is important to stress that the [UNPFII] expert group observed that … many of the discussions were ‘intertwined’ with the issue of racial discrimination. …

And that “… Indigenous participants were concerned that statistics, ‘although seemingly neutral’, could be applied for the benefit and the detriment of indigenous peoples” (2016:31).

These points regarding the utility of data both in the service of racial discrimination and in the service of Indigenous liberation *from* discrimination, take us back to the previous thread in this series:

#IDSov added,

This is where the classification of data as a form of property becomes critical. Diane Smith observes in the same volume, citing Martin Nakata & Marcia Langton (2006), and Jodi Bruhn (2014): “The ownership of, access to and control over the use of data are governance issues…

“.. Contrary to contemporary Western conceptualisations of corporate governance and ‘big data’ management systems, indigenous peoples’ governance … of data is not simply about the data. It is about the people who provide and govern an *asset* that happens to be data” (2016:130)

Such conceptualisations of corporate governance, which are a major feature of the Web 2.0 data economy, have emerged as an increasing problem for Western jurisdictions. In response, the EU recently issued the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR): https://eugdpr.org

Contrary to the trending dominance of corporate monopolies in the quasi-secret trade in personal data, the GDPR explicitly defines data as an asset that belongs to the people who generate it.

This definition of data as a personal asset reinforces a corollary classification by the World Economic Forum (https://www.weforum.org/reports/personal-data-emergence-new-asset-class …), and by the International Financial Reporting Standards Foundation (https://www.ifrs.org/issued-standards/list-of-standards/ias-38-intangible-assets/ …)

Although no legislation comparable to the GDPR yet exists in Australia, especially with regard to Indigenous data, these legal instruments establish an international precedent that, like the UNDRIP, provides a datum point for policy objectives in this national jurisdiction.

In keeping with the work of the UNPFII and the UNDRIP, @DataIndigenous was established partly in order to propagate standardised terms and definitions with this level of formalisation.

Establishing a formal, technically coherent language, consistent with the principles of #IDSov, is considered a pre-requisite for the the legal and functional implementation of Indigenous data governance *by* Indigenous peoples.

In the previous two threads in this series, we worked through …

… the technical definitions of data generally and Indigenous data more specifically, and discussed leading international legal instruments governing rights to data as a form of property, situated within the broader context on the UN Declaration of Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Today we will be discussing some of the leading community-controlled data governance initiatives around Australia, that are setting a standard for government engagement with Indigenous peoples on an equal footing.

Before we start however, a little bit of house keeping: Yesterday, a question was raised about what the @DataIndigenous initiative is, who it is led by, and who its staff are.

Most of the answers to these questions are available in the first couple of tweets in this week’s thread series, as well as on the @DataIndigenous web site: https://mspgh.unimelb.edu.au/centres-institutes/centre-for-health-equity/research-group/indigenous-data-network.

Tweets from the @DataIndigenous account and from accounts that the IDN has been invited to curate, are the responsibility of the @DataIndigenous initiative and its leadership. If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to contact us via the details on the web site.

These tweets are being authored by me, James Rose. I am the non-Indigenous technical coordinator of the IDN at the Indigenous Studies Unit, headed by Professor Marcia Langton, within the School for Population and Global Health at the University of Melbourne.

Details about my qualifications and professional experience are publicly available here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-w-w-rose-bb6b302a/?originalSubdomain=au … and here: https://unimelb.academia.edu/JamesRose

If you are interested in recent public seminars that I have given on the work of @DataIndigenous, including with Professor Langton, two of the most recent can be viewed here: https://arts.unimelb.edu.au/research/digital-studio/projects/indigenous-australia-and-digital-futures/indigenous-data-network … and here.

Speaking of videos, an especially excellent overview of the importance of community-controlled data governance was recently delivered by @Klick22, @DataIndigenous Steering Committee member and Scientia Fellow at the UNSW Centre for Big Data Research:

https://youtu.be/75G3TNUiRHc

During her recent curation of @IndigenousX, Dr Kalinda Griffiths @Klick22 also delivered an incisive argument in support of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership and research excellence in the use and reporting of community data:

https://indigenousx.com.au/lets-talk-about-counting-our-mob/

@DataIndigenous currently works to coordinate community-controlled data governance and research excellence across five primary community service delivery domains, including health, education, employment, justice system engagement, and cultural heritage preservation.

During the 2017 Data Sovereignty Symposium hosted by @IndigenousUoM, leading initiatives from across these domains were presented. This included the work of business intelligence analyst, GIS expert and @DataIndigenous member @darrenclinch.

In this excellent seminar, @darrenclinch explains how existing GIS technologies, which have been used historically to suppress and marginalise Indigenous population data, can be harnessed by Indigenous communities and used as a countermeasure.

Also presented at the 2017 symposium was the work of the Yawuru Knowledge and Wellbeing Project, which developed out of the Yawuru people’s successful native title claim in the Kimberley region of Western Australia

Here, Kimberley Institute CEO Eunice Yu, and Dr Mandy Yap of of The Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research ANU, explain the precedent-setting outcomes of the project’s data collection, modelling and analysis priorities, which were set by Yawuru people themselves.

As also outlined in their contribution to ‘Indigenous Data Sovereignty: Toward and Agenda’ (2016), this community-controlled research project revealed demographic patterns in the Yaruwuru population at a level of detail and accuracy never before achieved: https://press.anu.edu.au/publications/series/caepr/indigenous-data-sovereignty.

Another excellent example of a precedent-setting deployment of immunity-controlled data governance comes from the Maranguka Justice Reinvestment Project in Bourke, far-western NSW:

http://www.justreinvest.org.au/justice-reinvestment-in-bourke/

The development and success of this program was documented in the @ABCTV @4Corners program ‘Backing Bourke’:

https://www.abc.net.au/4corners/backing-bourke:-four-corners/7849600

As the Justice Reinvest team themselves state, the success off the program is based on “Data [that] has been collected to tell a very big story about a young person’s passage through the criminal justice system in Bourke …

“… Data has also been collected on the community’s outcomes in early life, education, employment, housing, healthcare, child safety, and health outcomes including mental health and drugs and alcohol. …

“… The data has been handed over to community members through community conversations held by local facilitators, and community feedback was recorded and fed back to the Bourke Tribal Council. …”

“… This feedback, together with the data, informed the development of goals, measures and strategies for the Maranguka Justice Reinvestment Project reflected in the document Growing our Kids Up Safe, Smart and Strong, was developed by the Bourke Tribal Council.”

 

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]1 July

Local, national and global perspectives on food systems were shared by organisers of the Food Governance 2019 conference at the University of Sydney. See more tweet coverage of the event here.