Informed, engaged communities for health

Search
Generic filters
Filter by Categories
@WePublicHealth2021
#CroakeyLIVE #Budget2021Health
#MHReform
#OutOfTheBox
#QldVotesHealth
#RCIADIC30Years
#RuralHealthJustice
#ShiftingGearsSummit
#TRIPSwaiver
2021 Floods
Budget2020Health
Bushfires
codesign
community control
COVID-19
Croakey Conference News Service
#2020ResearchExcellence
#21OPCC
#BackToTheFire
#GiantSteps21
#Govern4Health
#HealthReImagined
#HearMe21
#IndigenousClimateJustice21
#NNF2021
#RANZCP2021
#SAHeapsUnfair
#ValueBasedCare
#WCepi2021
#YHFSummit
Croakey Professional Services
#BetterCareCOVID
#CommunityControl
#COVIDthinktank21
#HealthClimateSolutions21
ACSQHC series
Lowitja Indigenous knowledge translation series
Croakey projects
@WePublicHealth
@WePublicHealth2020
#CommunityMatters
#CoveringClimateNow
#CroakeyLIVE #USvotesHealth
#CroakeyREAD
#CroakeyVOICES
#CroakeyYOUTH
#HealthyCOP26
#HousingJusticeAus
#JusticeCOVID
#LookingLocal
#MRFFtransparency
#OutOfPocket
#TalkingTeeth
AroundTheTraps
Caring for the Frontline
COVID SNAPS
COVIDglobalMHseries
Croakey longreads
CroakeyEXPLORE
Gavin Mooney
Inside Story
Journal Watch
PIJ Commissions 2020
Summer Reading 2019-2020
The Conversation
The Health Wrap
TOO MUCH of a Good Thing
CroakeyGO
#CroakeyGO #NavigatingHealth
#GamblingHarms
#HeatwaveHealth
Mapping CroakeyGo
CroakeyNews
Cultural determinants of health
Digital platforms
Elections and budgets
Federal Budget 2019-20
Federal Budget 2020-21
Federal Budget 2021-22
Global health and climate change
2019-20 climate bushfire emergency
asylum seeker and refugee health
Climate emergency
disasters
Ebola
extreme weather events
flooding 2011
global health
NHS
NZ Election 2017
WHO
health
Health workers
Healthcare and health reform
abortion
adverse events
aged care
allied health care
Australian Medical Association
cancer
cardiovascular disease
child health
Choosing Wisely
chronic diseases
co-payments
Cochrane Collaboration
complementary medicines
conflicts of interest
death and dying
diabetes
digital technology
disabilities
e-health
emergency departments and care
Equally Well
euthanasia
evidence-based issues
general practice
genetics
health & medical marketing
health and medical education
health and medical research
Health Care Homes
health ethics
health financing and costs
health reform
health regulation
health workforce
HIV/AIDS
hospitals
HRT
infectious diseases
influenza
international medical graduates
journal articles
LGBTIQ
medical marijuana
Medicare Locals
men's health
mental health
MyHospitals website
National Commission of Audit 2014
National Health Performance Authority
naturopathy
NDIS
NHMRC
non communicable diseases
nurses and nursing
oral health
organ transplants
out of pocket costs
pain
palliative care
paramedics
pathology
Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme
pharmaceutical industry
pharmacy
Pregnancy and childbirth
primary health care
Primary Health Networks
private health insurance
quality and safety of health care
rural and remote health
screening
sexual health
social media and healthcare
suicide
surgery
swine flu
telehealth
tests
TGA
trauma
women's health
youth health
Indigenous health
#CTG10
#NTRC
Acknowledgement
cultural safety
Indigenous education
Lowitja Institute
NT Intervention
social and emotional wellbeing
Uluru Statement
WA community closures
News about Croakey
PIJ Commissions 2021
Public health and population health
#PreventiveHealthStrategy
#UnmetNeedsinPublicHealth
air pollution
alcohol
consumer health matters
COVIDwrap
environmental health
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD)
food and nutrition
gambling
Government 2.0
gun control
health communications
health impact assessment
Health in All Policies
health inequalities
health literacy
human rights
illicit drugs
injuries
legal issues
marriage equality
Media Doctor Australia
media-related issues
nanny state
National Preventive Health Agency
obesity
occupational health
physical activity
plain packaging
prevention
public health
public interest journalism
road safety
sport
sugar tax
tobacco control
transport
vaccination
violence
Web 2.0
weight loss products
Royal Commission
Social determinants of health
discrimination
education
housing
justice
Justice Reinvestment
NBN
Newstart
poverty
racism
social policy
Summer reading 2020-2021
Tasmanian election 2021
The Croakey Archives
#cripcroakey
#HealthEquity16
#HealthMatters
#IHMayDay (all years)
#IHMayDay 2014
#IHMayDay15
#IHMayday16
#IHMayDay17
#IHMayDay18
#LoveRural 2014
Croakey Conference News Service 2013 – 2019
2013 conferences
Australian Centre for Health Services Innovation Forum 2013
Australian Health Promotion Association Conference 2013
Closing the Credibility Gap 2013
CRANAplus Conference 2013
FASD Conference 2013
Health Workforce Australia 2013
International Health Literacy Network Conference 2013
NACCHO Summit 2013
National Rural Health Conference 2013
Oceania EcoHealth Symposium 2013
PHAA conference 2013
2014 conferences
#IPCHIV14
AIDA Conference 2014
Congress Lowitja 2014
CRANAplus conference 2014
Cultural Solutions - Healing Foundation forum 2014
Lowitja Institute Continuous Quality Improvement conference 2014
National Suicide Prevention Conference 2014
Racism and children/youth health symposium 2014
Rural & Remote Health Scientific Symposium 2014
2015 conferences
#CPHCEforum
#CRANAplus15
#HSR15
#NRHC15
#OTCC15
Population Health Congress 2015
2016 conferences
#AHHAsim16
#AHMRC16
#ANROWS2016
#ATSISPEP
#AusCanIndigenousWellness
#cphce2016
#CPHCEforum16
#CRANAplus2016
#IAMRA2016
#LowitjaConf2016
#PreventObesity16
#TowardsRecovery
#VMIAC16
#WearablesCEH
#WICC2016
2017 conferences
#17APCC
#ACEM17
#AIDAconf2017
#BTH20
#CATSINaM17
#ClimateHealthStrategy
#IAHAConf17
#IDS17
#LBQWHC17
#LivingOurWay
#OKtoAskAu
#OTCC2017
#ResearchTranslation17
#TheMHS2017
#VMIACConf17
#WCPH2017
Australian Palliative Care Conference
2018 conferences
#6rrhss
#ACEM18
#AHPA2018
#ATSISPC18
#CPHCE
#MHED18
#NDISMentalHealth
#Nurseforce
#OKToAsk2018
#RANZCOG18
#ResearchIntoPolicy
#VHAawards
#VMIACAwards18
#WISPC18
2019 Conferences
#ACEM19
#CPHCE19
#EquallyWellAust
#GiantSteps19
#HealthAdvocacyWIM
#KTthatWorks
#LowitjaConf2019
#MHAgeing
#NNF2019
#OKtoAsk2019
#RANZCOG19
#RANZCP2019
#ruralhealthconf
#VMIAC2019
#WHOcollabAHPRA
Croakey Professional Services archive
#bettercareseries
#CommunityControl Twitter Festival
ACSQHC series 2019
Croakey projects archive
#IndigenousHealthSummit
#IndigenousNCDs
#JustClimate
#JustJustice
Croakey register of influence
Croakey Register of Influencers in Public Health
Croakey Register of Unreleased Documents
Naked Doctor
Poems of Public Health
Summer Reading 2016-2017
Summer Reading 2017-2018
The Koori Woman
Wonky Health
CroakeyGO archive 2017 – 2018
CroakeyGo 2017
#CroakeyGO Adelaide 2017
#CroakeyGO Melbourne 2017
#CroakeyGO Newcastle 2017
#CroakeyGO Sydney 2017
CroakeyGo 2018
#CroakeyGO #QuantumWords 2018
#CroakeyGO #VicVotes 2018
#CroakeyGO Albury 2018
#CroakeyGO Callan Park 2018
#CroakeyGO Carnarvon 2018
#CroakeyGO Marrickville 2018
#CroakeyGO Palm Island 2018
Elections and Budgets 2013 – 2019
#AusVotesHealth Twitter Festival 2019
#Health4NSW
#HealthElection16
Federal Budget 2009-2010
Federal Budget 2010
Federal Budget 2011
Federal Budget 2012-2013
Federal Budget 2013-14
Federal Budget 2014-15
Federal Budget 2015-16
Federal Budget 2016-17
Federal Budget 2017/18
Federal Budget 2018-19
Federal Election 2010
Federal Election 2013
Federal Election 2016
Federal Election 2019
NSW Election 2015
NSW Election 2019
NT Election 2016
Qld Election 2015
Victorian Election 2014
WA election 2021
Support non-profit public interest journalism
Search
Generic filters
Filter by Categories
@WePublicHealth2021
#CroakeyLIVE #Budget2021Health
#MHReform
#OutOfTheBox
#QldVotesHealth
#RCIADIC30Years
#RuralHealthJustice
#ShiftingGearsSummit
#TRIPSwaiver
2021 Floods
Budget2020Health
Bushfires
codesign
community control
COVID-19
Croakey Conference News Service
#2020ResearchExcellence
#21OPCC
#BackToTheFire
#GiantSteps21
#Govern4Health
#HealthReImagined
#HearMe21
#IndigenousClimateJustice21
#NNF2021
#RANZCP2021
#SAHeapsUnfair
#ValueBasedCare
#WCepi2021
#YHFSummit
Croakey Professional Services
#BetterCareCOVID
#CommunityControl
#COVIDthinktank21
#HealthClimateSolutions21
ACSQHC series
Lowitja Indigenous knowledge translation series
Croakey projects
@WePublicHealth
@WePublicHealth2020
#CommunityMatters
#CoveringClimateNow
#CroakeyLIVE #USvotesHealth
#CroakeyREAD
#CroakeyVOICES
#CroakeyYOUTH
#HealthyCOP26
#HousingJusticeAus
#JusticeCOVID
#LookingLocal
#MRFFtransparency
#OutOfPocket
#TalkingTeeth
AroundTheTraps
Caring for the Frontline
COVID SNAPS
COVIDglobalMHseries
Croakey longreads
CroakeyEXPLORE
Gavin Mooney
Inside Story
Journal Watch
PIJ Commissions 2020
Summer Reading 2019-2020
The Conversation
The Health Wrap
TOO MUCH of a Good Thing
CroakeyGO
#CroakeyGO #NavigatingHealth
#GamblingHarms
#HeatwaveHealth
Mapping CroakeyGo
CroakeyNews
Cultural determinants of health
Digital platforms
Elections and budgets
Federal Budget 2019-20
Federal Budget 2020-21
Federal Budget 2021-22
Global health and climate change
2019-20 climate bushfire emergency
asylum seeker and refugee health
Climate emergency
disasters
Ebola
extreme weather events
flooding 2011
global health
NHS
NZ Election 2017
WHO
health
Health workers
Healthcare and health reform
abortion
adverse events
aged care
allied health care
Australian Medical Association
cancer
cardiovascular disease
child health
Choosing Wisely
chronic diseases
co-payments
Cochrane Collaboration
complementary medicines
conflicts of interest
death and dying
diabetes
digital technology
disabilities
e-health
emergency departments and care
Equally Well
euthanasia
evidence-based issues
general practice
genetics
health & medical marketing
health and medical education
health and medical research
Health Care Homes
health ethics
health financing and costs
health reform
health regulation
health workforce
HIV/AIDS
hospitals
HRT
infectious diseases
influenza
international medical graduates
journal articles
LGBTIQ
medical marijuana
Medicare Locals
men's health
mental health
MyHospitals website
National Commission of Audit 2014
National Health Performance Authority
naturopathy
NDIS
NHMRC
non communicable diseases
nurses and nursing
oral health
organ transplants
out of pocket costs
pain
palliative care
paramedics
pathology
Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme
pharmaceutical industry
pharmacy
Pregnancy and childbirth
primary health care
Primary Health Networks
private health insurance
quality and safety of health care
rural and remote health
screening
sexual health
social media and healthcare
suicide
surgery
swine flu
telehealth
tests
TGA
trauma
women's health
youth health
Indigenous health
#CTG10
#NTRC
Acknowledgement
cultural safety
Indigenous education
Lowitja Institute
NT Intervention
social and emotional wellbeing
Uluru Statement
WA community closures
News about Croakey
PIJ Commissions 2021
Public health and population health
#PreventiveHealthStrategy
#UnmetNeedsinPublicHealth
air pollution
alcohol
consumer health matters
COVIDwrap
environmental health
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD)
food and nutrition
gambling
Government 2.0
gun control
health communications
health impact assessment
Health in All Policies
health inequalities
health literacy
human rights
illicit drugs
injuries
legal issues
marriage equality
Media Doctor Australia
media-related issues
nanny state
National Preventive Health Agency
obesity
occupational health
physical activity
plain packaging
prevention
public health
public interest journalism
road safety
sport
sugar tax
tobacco control
transport
vaccination
violence
Web 2.0
weight loss products
Royal Commission
Social determinants of health
discrimination
education
housing
justice
Justice Reinvestment
NBN
Newstart
poverty
racism
social policy
Summer reading 2020-2021
Tasmanian election 2021
The Croakey Archives
#cripcroakey
#HealthEquity16
#HealthMatters
#IHMayDay (all years)
#IHMayDay 2014
#IHMayDay15
#IHMayday16
#IHMayDay17
#IHMayDay18
#LoveRural 2014
Croakey Conference News Service 2013 – 2019
2013 conferences
Australian Centre for Health Services Innovation Forum 2013
Australian Health Promotion Association Conference 2013
Closing the Credibility Gap 2013
CRANAplus Conference 2013
FASD Conference 2013
Health Workforce Australia 2013
International Health Literacy Network Conference 2013
NACCHO Summit 2013
National Rural Health Conference 2013
Oceania EcoHealth Symposium 2013
PHAA conference 2013
2014 conferences
#IPCHIV14
AIDA Conference 2014
Congress Lowitja 2014
CRANAplus conference 2014
Cultural Solutions - Healing Foundation forum 2014
Lowitja Institute Continuous Quality Improvement conference 2014
National Suicide Prevention Conference 2014
Racism and children/youth health symposium 2014
Rural & Remote Health Scientific Symposium 2014
2015 conferences
#CPHCEforum
#CRANAplus15
#HSR15
#NRHC15
#OTCC15
Population Health Congress 2015
2016 conferences
#AHHAsim16
#AHMRC16
#ANROWS2016
#ATSISPEP
#AusCanIndigenousWellness
#cphce2016
#CPHCEforum16
#CRANAplus2016
#IAMRA2016
#LowitjaConf2016
#PreventObesity16
#TowardsRecovery
#VMIAC16
#WearablesCEH
#WICC2016
2017 conferences
#17APCC
#ACEM17
#AIDAconf2017
#BTH20
#CATSINaM17
#ClimateHealthStrategy
#IAHAConf17
#IDS17
#LBQWHC17
#LivingOurWay
#OKtoAskAu
#OTCC2017
#ResearchTranslation17
#TheMHS2017
#VMIACConf17
#WCPH2017
Australian Palliative Care Conference
2018 conferences
#6rrhss
#ACEM18
#AHPA2018
#ATSISPC18
#CPHCE
#MHED18
#NDISMentalHealth
#Nurseforce
#OKToAsk2018
#RANZCOG18
#ResearchIntoPolicy
#VHAawards
#VMIACAwards18
#WISPC18
2019 Conferences
#ACEM19
#CPHCE19
#EquallyWellAust
#GiantSteps19
#HealthAdvocacyWIM
#KTthatWorks
#LowitjaConf2019
#MHAgeing
#NNF2019
#OKtoAsk2019
#RANZCOG19
#RANZCP2019
#ruralhealthconf
#VMIAC2019
#WHOcollabAHPRA
Croakey Professional Services archive
#bettercareseries
#CommunityControl Twitter Festival
ACSQHC series 2019
Croakey projects archive
#IndigenousHealthSummit
#IndigenousNCDs
#JustClimate
#JustJustice
Croakey register of influence
Croakey Register of Influencers in Public Health
Croakey Register of Unreleased Documents
Naked Doctor
Poems of Public Health
Summer Reading 2016-2017
Summer Reading 2017-2018
The Koori Woman
Wonky Health
CroakeyGO archive 2017 – 2018
CroakeyGo 2017
#CroakeyGO Adelaide 2017
#CroakeyGO Melbourne 2017
#CroakeyGO Newcastle 2017
#CroakeyGO Sydney 2017
CroakeyGo 2018
#CroakeyGO #QuantumWords 2018
#CroakeyGO #VicVotes 2018
#CroakeyGO Albury 2018
#CroakeyGO Callan Park 2018
#CroakeyGO Carnarvon 2018
#CroakeyGO Marrickville 2018
#CroakeyGO Palm Island 2018
Elections and Budgets 2013 – 2019
#AusVotesHealth Twitter Festival 2019
#Health4NSW
#HealthElection16
Federal Budget 2009-2010
Federal Budget 2010
Federal Budget 2011
Federal Budget 2012-2013
Federal Budget 2013-14
Federal Budget 2014-15
Federal Budget 2015-16
Federal Budget 2016-17
Federal Budget 2017/18
Federal Budget 2018-19
Federal Election 2010
Federal Election 2013
Federal Election 2016
Federal Election 2019
NSW Election 2015
NSW Election 2019
NT Election 2016
Qld Election 2015
Victorian Election 2014
WA election 2021

Grave fears for safety of children and other prisoners during pandemic

*** This post was updated on 4 October with Twitter analytics for the event ***

Grave fears for the safety of children and other prisoners held in pandemic lockdown were raised during a public forum hosted by Croakey this week.

Robyn Oxley, a Tharawal and Yorta Yorta woman and lecturer in criminology at Western Sydney University, sounded the alarm about the impact of isolating children in detention as a “health response” to the pandemic rather than releasing them.

Oxley is an Independent Visitor under the Commission for Children and Young People in Victoria, and before the pandemic physically visited youth prisons each month, at Parkville and Malmsbury, to check on Aboriginal children and young people.

Since the pandemic, her contact has been limited to Zoom, she told a Twitter festival launching Croakey’s new #JusticeCOVID publication (download here).

Some children had been seven months with no physical contact with family. “No hugs, no kisses, no contact,” Oxley tweeted.

She said:

Prisons are no place for anyone, let alone children and young people. These children have been in lockdown, far worse than any Melbournian could ever even imagine, for seven months.

These children have been punished enough. They have been exposed to the violence of prisons at such an early age. It is not only time to raise the age of criminal responsibility. It is time to release these children and let them be kids.

We need to be thinking about what it means to be locking kids up! How it impacts their life now and in the future. We need to ask ourselves are we OK with this?”

The Twitter festival, moderated by Dr Tess Ryan, shared wide-ranging discussions from Aboriginal community organisations, prison abolition and reform advocates, public interest journalism advocates, researchers, legal experts and health leaders.

It came as the Sentencing Advisory Council in Victoria released a new report showing increasing numbers of children are being held in remand in Victoria, often because there are inadequate supports for them in the community (see more in this Twitter thread). Many do not end up receiving a custodial sentence.

Dan Nicholson,  Executive Director, Criminal Law at Victoria Legal Aid, said on Twitter that too many kids are being locked up because of issues in their lives, such as lack of housing or community support, not the offences they’ve committed.

He said: “Time on remand causes further harm to kids, most of whom have survived trauma or neglect. It makes it more likely they’ll commit further offences.

Imagine if we made better choices with the millions we waste on remanding kids each year? Gave these kids hope and opportunity?”

Below is a full report of the #JusticeCOVID Twitter Festival.


Introductions and official launch

Dr Janine Mohamed, chair of Croakey Health Media


Public interest journalism matters

The Judith Neilson Institute for Journalism and Ideas

The coronavirus pandemic has had a profound and negative effect on much of the media industry. But, the need for public interest journalism — reporting that ensures the community is well and fairly informed — is as strong as ever.

The Institute has been working to support journalism in Australia throughout the pandemic. We have backed community broadcasting and fact-checking initiatives, as well as helping media organisations engage freelance and casual contributors.

Croakey News freelance journalists, writers and data visualisation designers have done an outstanding job to provide information and expert commentary on prisoner health during the coronavirus crisis.

Their reporting has brought transparency and debate to an important but often-overlooked issue. It is an excellent example of the public interest journalism that is needed at this difficult time.

You can also stay up to date with the Institute’s activities by visiting our website and subscribing for updates.


Another missed opportunity to reimagine the justice system

Nerita Waight, CEO of VALS & Co-chair of NATSILS

Prisons are epicentres for the spread of COVID-19, like aged-care or cruise ships. We’ve seen outbreaks in Victoria, Queensland and NSW; we’ve seen lockdown, solitary confinement. But no proactive measures from governments to stop mob going into prison or reduce prison numbers.

Instead, governments have policed the pandemic.

In NSW, the top 10 areas where fine recipients lived, seven had Aboriginal populations of 1,000+. Suburbs with most fines were the poorest, with no correlation to where the most COVID-19 cases were.

Similarly here in Victoria, Aboriginal people made up 4.7% of the fines, despite making up just 0.8% of the population. Poor communities & South Sudanese people were targeted. Like in NSW, young people are being targeted.

At the height of Stage 4, an Aboriginal man was allegedly knocked off his bike and ended up in hospital with arm injuries. He was an essential worker riding to work. He says police called him offensive names and fined him.

We also saw heavy handed policing at #BlackLivesMatter peaceful rallies including pepper spray, arrests, large numbers of police. Rally organisers were accused of causing spread of #COVID19Aus despite medical evidence saying there was no community transmission.

It’s heartbreaking to see State Budget after State Budget invest billions in new prisons and extending old ones and yet so little on prevention, diversion and transition supports. It has turned the criminalisation of communities into an income stream for companies.

Meanwhile in prisons, punitive restrictions have caused harm to our people. There have been over 40 positive #COVID19Aus cases connected to prisons here in Victoria, including 19 children testing positive. Kids have been held in isolation in tiny cells for weeks.

In Queensland, 130 children, some as young as 13, were held in solitary confinement after a #COVID91Aus outbreak at Brisbane Youth Detention Centre. We know the devastating lifelong damage solitary confinement has on kids’ mental health.

Aboriginal people are most at risk of dying from #COVID19Aus due to effects of colonisation like chronic illness. This is compounded by our overincarceration. We’ve called for governments to act to release mob from prison to prevent black deaths in custody. We can’t afford to wait.

My question to our governments remains the same: are they truly committed to keeping everyone safe during these unprecedented times? And do our governments value the lives of people in detention?

Will they show courage and leadership, and immediately decrease the number of people in detention to mitigate Victoria’s collective harm and loss? They need only look overseas, to the many countries adopting decarceration strategies, for guidance and inspiration.

Places of detention are not insulated from the rest of the community; people enter and exit places of detention on a daily basis, including people who are released back into the community and people who enter detention upon arrest or sentencing, as well as staff and contractors

The porous nature of detention facilities makes it highly likely that any COVID-19 outbreaks in detention will spread to the community. The health of the people in custody is inextricably linked to the health of all Victorians during this pandemic.

We have seen the devastation that comes with the spread of COVID-19 in detention in countries such as the US.

An American Civil Liberties Union study concluded that ‘COVID-19 could claim the lives of approximately 100,000 more people than current projections stipulate if jail populations are not dramatically and immediately reduced, according to a new epidemiological model.’

In a joint media release on 20 July 2020, VALS, Human Rights Law Centre, Fitzroy Legal Service, Inner Melbourne Community Legal and Flemington & Kensington Community Legal Centre recommended that the number of people in detention be reduced by:

  • Granting administrative leave on health grounds to those most at risk of COVID-19 and most impacted by restrictive measures – like increased use of solitary confinement – being used to try to contain the virus.
  • Priority in this process should be given to elderly people, people with chronic health conditions, people with disability and mental health conditions, children, young people and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • Using existing legal powers to grant 14 days early release to people in prison who are close to the end of their sentence. Granting parole or leave to people in prison who pose a low risk to the community if released;
  • Granting parole or leave to children and young people, so that they can be with, and be supported by, their families and community during this ongoing public health emergency; and
  • Making bail more accessible for children, young people and adults on remand, who are yet to be found guilty of any criminal offending and who pose a low risk to the community if released.

Bail reform will advance the decarceration strategies crucial to keeping all Victorians safe.

@thevalsmob and the legal sector have made a number of recommendations on previous occasions in relation to the need for bail reform. The pandemic only makes the issue of bail reform more urgent, and the Government should not wait until after the pandemic to address the concerns.

Around half (46.2%) of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people in prison (and 61.4% of Aboriginal women) are in prison purely on remand and may be released never having been sentenced to imprisonment.

Governments must prevent more #deathsinside. Back the call of First Nations families whose siblings, cousins, parents and partners have died in custody by signing the petition to #CleanOutPrisons.

Until there is an end to police investigating police nothing will change. There must be independent investigation of police & referrals for prosecution where there is sufficient evidence.If anyone is interested in the work VALS does please check out our website here and our Twitter handle is @thevalsmob. NATSILS is the national peak for our ATSILS across Australia and does incredible work advocating on justice issues affecting our mob. Their twitter handle is @NATSILS_ and their website.


Stand with us. And clean out prisons

Tabitha Lean, Gunditjmara woman 

I want to challenge the belief that caging, exiling and controlling people makes us safe. Abolition is an invitation to imagine a different kind of world-a world with communities grounded in love and care.

I’m a formerly incarcerated woman having spent almost two years in Adelaide Women’s Prison and Adelaide Pre Release Centre. I have also done almost two years on Home Detention and will be tethered to the system for three more years on parole (or as I call it, open air prison).

Because right now, what we have is lethal for black fullas…even breathing in front of a cop is a risk. We must abolish systems that are anti black and hell bent on killing us.

That’s why I am proudly part of the National Network of Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Women and Girls convened by the formidable and indefatigable Debbie Kilroy.

We are fighting to have our voice heard. We believe that centring the voices of those with lived experience has the capacity to change the face of (so called) justice in this country.

It might sound Pollyanna, but in my mind, the key to health, safety, stability and liberation has never and will never be found in punishment and imprisonment.

I believe that prisons and police are part of the arsenal of the settler colonial war machine. If we dismantle systems that cage and punish, we can explicitly fight genocide and dispossession and create a world focused on radical reciprocity and accountability.

In our article published by Croakey, Debbie Kilroy, Vickie Roach and I lay out the National Networks call to decarcerate…now…and especially during a pandemic. While we call for widespread releases and total decarceration, we also lay out a ten point plan governments could use to stage releases, given we know they like the path of least resistance

So what do I mean when I say the PIC? The prison industrial complex is the entire overlapping interests of state and industry that employ policing, surveillance, imprisonment and punishment as a means of controlling populations and furthering the colonial project.

In my view the PIC both feeds on and maintains oppression and inequalities through the machinations of power: punishment, violence and control

And I have no interest in reforming a white supremacist system built with the purpose of oppressing, controlling and facilitating the premature death of our people.

Abolition as a movement is anti-racist, anti-capitalist, anti-sexist, anti-misogynist, anti-transphobic, anti-homophobic- it has to be internationalist, pro-cooperation and feminist

And you know abolition might sound like a radical idea, but people have been working towards it for decades. Certainly, Aboriginal people have been fighting against the enslaving and incarcerating of our people for 232 years

So stand with us. With all of you standing by our sides, shoulder to shoulder, we can pull down this brutal, violent and deadly industry. Let’s open up dialogues of curiosity and possibility. Abolition can be fun if we all muck in. Let’s make it happen.


Calling for real action on prisons, policing and injustice

Robyn Oxley

Ngumbi!!

My name is Robyn Oxley. I am Tharawal and Yorta Yorta woman. I grew up in Minto, NSW and my family still live on country. I am a lecturer at Western Sydney University in Criminology.

I would like to acknowledge the land on where my teaching, learning & research is undertaken – Wurundjeri Land, part of the Kulin Nations. I would like to pay respects to the Wurundjeri Elders & my Elders, Tharawal & Yorta Yorta, past and present.

I would also like to acknowledge that I will be spending the next 15 minutes tweeting about children and young people and recognise that many children, since colonisation, never made it home and the ones that did make it home or still trying. We see you and we love you!

My research areas include but are not limited to: Aboriginal affairs within the criminal justice system. My Masters thesis examines pre/post release support for Aboriginal people who are in prison or about to leave. Self-determination as opposed to inclusion within the criminal justice system!

Today I want to share my involvement with the criminal justice system as an Independent Visitor (IVP) under the Commission for Children & Young People.

Being part of the Independent Visitor Program, I am usually able to physically visit the youth prisons each month, at Parkville & Malmsbury, to check in on the Aboriginal children and young people.

Since COVID-19 lockdown, this has only been able to be completed by Zoom. Not only are we able to check in, make sure they have access to legal representation, their human rights met, access to family and enough things to keep them busy.

Parkville and Mamsbury have not been able to have any outside visitors – which means NO FAMILY – since March. That’s seven months with no physical contact with family. No hugs, no kisses, no contact.

Prisons are no place for anyone, let alone children and young people. These children have been in lockdown, far worse than any Melbournian could ever even imagine, for seven months.

At any given time during COVID – there seems to be around 100 at each facility. That’s total of all children and young people. But, naturally, it fluctuates every day.

When they ‘arrive’ at either Malmsbury or Parkville, they begin their 14-day isolation. As a child outside prison, it impacts mental health, significantly. My 10-year-old is suffering re lockdowns so I cannot imagine what it would be like for any child in prison.

Isolation has been used as a behavioural tool in prisons and now we see it being used in relation to a health response. It simply is not good enough that these children are kept in prison.

Read the Twitter thread here.

There were many calls to release people in prison as there were positive tests from workers of youth prisons, exposing children and young people to COVID-19, in a confined space that could spread through every Unit quite easily and quickly.

We saw this happen in Brisbane about a month ago. The response around COVID-19 in prisons in Australia has been limited with the only solution, isolating children even more as the ‘health response’.

The response should have been to release young people. Not allow them to be exposed to a deadly virus and continually isolate children from family and the time of disconnect they have endured since the Melbourne lockdown began.

These children have been punished enough. They have been exposed to the violence of prisons at such an early age. It is not only time to raise the age of criminal responsibility. It is time to release these children and let them be kids.

We need to be thinking about what it means to be locking kids up! How it impacts their life now and in the future. We need to ask ourselves are we OK with this? And if you are ok with this – why?

What is a child ‘offender’? Even the word ‘offender’ leaves a bad taste in my mouth. It doesn’t exist for children or adults who are in prison. They are not offenders they are people.

We need to be very careful with the language we use to ‘describe’ or ‘title’ people. We know the damage of using psychologically demeaning words has on the mental health of people so why do we do it to people in prisons?

This country is obsessed with punishment. There is an unhealthy relationship with prisons in the form of over-reliance, overfunding and overuse of prisons. It is not the only way to address ‘crime’!

We have seen curfews enforced re COVID-19, with no real use and no explanation as to why they were imposed. Just the acceptance of society that it be done. No questions asked!

So why do we continue to allow children in prisons with a real threat of COVID-19 spreading in an institution that punishes and has continued to punish when there should have been a health response to a health issue.

If you want to listen to a seminar on “The ‘myth’ of a child ‘offender’” please click on this link.


Public health lessons from “the world’s leader in incarceration”

Dr Lesley Russell

I follow politics and policy issues across both Australia and the United States and have done a series of analyses contrasting / comparing coronavirus responses in both countries for @USSC. You can find them here –https://ussc.edu.au/experts/lesley-russell

Coronavirus in prisons poses an additional threat to racial minorities and First Nations people – significantly over-represented in incarcerated populations in US and at increased risk from coronavirus infection and death. https://ussc.edu.au/analysis/how-bad-is-coronavirus-in-jails

Situation in US jails, prisons, correctional institutions, detention centres (operated by feds and states) bad from beginning, data inconsistently reported. Best sources @nytimes @MarshallProj @uclaprisonlaw – more reliable than @CDCgov @OfficialFBOP

Current estimates US prisons and jails: 218,000+ people infected; 1265+ inmates & staff died. Many prisons county hotspots as inmate and staff churn means infections travel to/from communities.

Facilities are very overcrowded; significant numbers of older, sicker inmates; poor hygiene and healthcare facilities; insufficient PPE. When families can’t visit, no extras like soap, handwipes etc

Trump has implemented some criminal justice reforms but much less action than he claims. At same time Republicans are trying to prevent those released from voting.

Will #BlackLivesMatter be the catalyst for change? Lots to discuss around this. https://sentencingproject.org/wp-content/upl

And don’t forget: Even less known re what is happening in immigration detention and processing. ICE now reports some statistics, but how accurate? https://ice.gov/coronavirus 50% of all individuals tested until June 4 tested +ve.


An opportunity for public policy change

Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT)

Like much of Australia, AMSANT has spent the best part of 2020 consumed by the COVID-19 pandemic, which has brought to the forefront issues on which AMSANT has been advocating for years. We’ve been asked to share our experiences of this for #JusticeCOVID.

The pandemic has highlighted serious inequities in access to healthcare, housing, food security and wealth distribution that have placed many Aboriginal communities at significantly greater risk from health threats for years https://caepr.cass.anu.edu.au/research/publications/indigenous-australians-and-covid-19-crisis-perspectives-public-policy

Socioeconomic, political, cultural and geographical barriers for Aboriginal people accessing healthcare have been highlighted during COVID-19. Distances from services, workforce shortages &inequitable resource distribution present major challenges for COVID-19 control.

ACCHSs have been working tirelessly through this period to get and keep staff on the ground. Efforts must now be made to sustainably boost local workforce capacity to ensure it meets the health needs of the communities it serves, both in the time of COVID-19 and beyond.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-05-04/coronavirus-nt-aboriginal-outcomes-show-lessons-for-future/12188762

A COVID-19 outbreak in an Aboriginal community with overcrowded housing would be very difficult to contain. The present housing situation is a breach of fundamental human rights and is an issue AMSANT continues to advocate around #JusticeCOVID.

On a jurisdictional level, AMSANT  has been advocating with and on behalf of ACCHSs for the NT Govt to adopt measures to keep COVID-19 out of NT communities. We’ve had success on issues such border control, quarantine, pandemic planning and the biosecurity restrictions.

ACCHS worked with other Aboriginal organisations to advocate for a closed border and later for a cautious reopening.

@CAACongress also developed an outbreak strategy that will work in communities with overcrowded housing and this has been adopted by the NT Govt.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have been leading the way for immediate solutions to the COVID-19 crisis. Moving forwards, there is much to learn from the successes of the ACCHS sector and from Indigenous health leadership.

Space has been created for long-term solutions that address the deeper drivers of ill-health including housing, poverty, racism and unemployment. We must seize this opportunity to build a more equitable future for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.


Data gaps

Associate Professor Megan Williams and others also raised concerns about inadequate data on prisoner health, especially during the pandemic.


Other issues raised


In conclusion

Dr Tess Ryan

During the pandemic, we’ve heard so much about other at-risk populations, such as people in aged care and healthcare workers. Where is the concern for those held in prison and detention? The pandemic has taught us that the health of the most vulnerable matters for everyone.

During this health crisis, that is what has kept me awake at night. We should be carefully considering what kind of future society we want, and taking ownership of what got us to this point. Humanity should always be at the front of any choice.

Rather than address #JusticeCOVID concerns, we’ve seen punitive policing and policies that have exacerbated rather than addressed concerns about prisons, especially for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Those not within the prison community have used words of feeling oppressed, controlled, ‘in prison’ even. If we are feeling that sense of policing and enforcement, together with fear, what is happening in the minds of those prisoners? and why don’t we seem to care?

So shocking to hear about the punitive approaches taken to children and young people in detention and prison during the pandemic. It’s critical that governments #RaiseTheAge and provide care, rather than punishment for at-risk children

In a previous work life I worked in out of home care and child protection. I saw first hand the impacts on children, some placed in detention as young as 12-years-old. It left me as a worker with trauma. The trauma children must feel in detention currently would be terrible.

Download the #JusticeCOVID publication.


Twitter analytics

According to Symplur, 414 Twitter accounts engaged with the #JusticeCOVID hashtag between 27 September and 4 October, sending more than 2,000 tweets and creating more than 16 million Twitter impressions.

See the Twitter transcript here.


For more information on the #JusticeCOVID project, see the stories published, read this media statement and follow the news at the #JusticeCOVID Facebook page.

The project was supported by the Judith Neilson Institute for Journalism and Ideas.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Search by: Categories or tags

Search
Generic filters
Filter by Categories
@WePublicHealth2021
#CroakeyLIVE #Budget2021Health
#MHReform
#OutOfTheBox
#QldVotesHealth
#RCIADIC30Years
#RuralHealthJustice
#ShiftingGearsSummit
#TRIPSwaiver
2021 Floods
Budget2020Health
Bushfires
codesign
community control
COVID-19
Croakey Conference News Service
#2020ResearchExcellence
#21OPCC
#BackToTheFire
#GiantSteps21
#Govern4Health
#HealthReImagined
#HearMe21
#IndigenousClimateJustice21
#NNF2021
#RANZCP2021
#SAHeapsUnfair
#ValueBasedCare
#WCepi2021
#YHFSummit
Croakey Professional Services
#BetterCareCOVID
#CommunityControl
#COVIDthinktank21
#HealthClimateSolutions21
ACSQHC series
Healthdirect Australia series 2019
Lowitja Indigenous knowledge translation series
Croakey projects
@WePublicHealth
@WePublicHealth2020
#CommunityMatters
#CoveringClimateNow
#CroakeyLIVE #USvotesHealth
#CroakeyREAD
#CroakeyVOICES
#CroakeyYOUTH
#HealthyCOP26
#HousingJusticeAus
#JusticeCOVID
#LookingLocal
#MRFFtransparency
#OutOfPocket
#TalkingTeeth
AroundTheTraps
Caring for the Frontline
COVID SNAPS
COVIDglobalMHseries
Croakey longreads
CroakeyEXPLORE
Gavin Mooney
Inside Story
Journal Watch
PIJ Commissions 2020
Summer Reading 2019-2020
The Conversation
The Health Wrap
TOO MUCH of a Good Thing
CroakeyGO
#CroakeyGO #NavigatingHealth
#GamblingHarms
#HeatwaveHealth
Mapping CroakeyGo
CroakeyNews
Cultural determinants of health
Digital platforms
Elections and budgets
Federal Budget 2019-20
Federal Budget 2020-21
Federal Budget 2021-22
Global health and climate change
2019-20 climate bushfire emergency
asylum seeker and refugee health
Climate emergency
disasters
Ebola
extreme weather events
flooding 2011
global health
NHS
NZ Election 2017
WHO
health
Health workers
Healthcare and health reform
abortion
adverse events
aged care
allied health care
Australian Medical Association
cancer
cardiovascular disease
child health
Choosing Wisely
chronic diseases
co-payments
Cochrane Collaboration
complementary medicines
conflicts of interest
death and dying
diabetes
digital technology
disabilities
e-health
emergency departments and care
Equally Well
euthanasia
evidence-based issues
general practice
genetics
health & medical marketing
health and medical education
health and medical research
Health Care Homes
health ethics
health financing and costs
health reform
health regulation
health workforce
HIV/AIDS
hospitals
HRT
infectious diseases
influenza
international medical graduates
journal articles
LGBTIQ
medical marijuana
Medicare Locals
men's health
mental health
MyHospitals website
National Commission of Audit 2014
National Health Performance Authority
naturopathy
NDIS
NHMRC
non communicable diseases
nurses and nursing
oral health
organ transplants
out of pocket costs
pain
palliative care
paramedics
pathology
Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme
pharmaceutical industry
pharmacy
Pregnancy and childbirth
primary health care
Primary Health Networks
private health insurance
quality and safety of health care
rural and remote health
screening
sexual health
social media and healthcare
suicide
surgery
swine flu
telehealth
tests
TGA
trauma
women's health
youth health
Indigenous health
#CTG10
#NTRC
Acknowledgement
cultural safety
Indigenous education
Lowitja Institute
NT Intervention
social and emotional wellbeing
Uluru Statement
WA community closures
News about Croakey
PIJ Commissions 2021
Public health and population health
#PreventiveHealthStrategy
#UnmetNeedsinPublicHealth
air pollution
alcohol
consumer health matters
COVIDwrap